Talkin' Bout Onions

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Talkin' Bout Onions

So here's the deal, I'm starting culinary school soon and I'm for lack of better wording a bit compulsive with being prepared. Heck, I memorized the schools blueprints before even stepping foot inside it for Orientation. Now, I had knee surgery in February and the recovery process is where I really started enjoying cooking and wanting to progress at it and truly begin to understand it. So I've been cooking and practicing my knife skills through such endeavors, but I feel that I'm still not up to the level I set upon myself for entry into school. I of course realize that through school and finding a job in the industry, I'll have more practice than I could ask for, yet I still get that uneasy feeling that I'm somehow unprepared. So I went out and bought some large sacks of onions and potatoes. My question now is, what am I gonna do with pounds upon pounds of various sized dices, juliennes, all that jazz, of onion? Some things that come to mind are french onion soup, potato soup, mass quantities of vegetable stock, veggie soup, etc. Here's the catch though, it's only me and my mom currently living in the house and my mom eats about a 1/3 of what I do, so large batches of food would be wasted. Any ideas?

BrianShaw's picture
BrianShaw
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Joined: 2011-05-19 08:42

Freeze the onions and fry the potatos.

GreenBake's picture
GreenBake
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Joined: 2011-05-15 22:37

Suggestion 1:
Caramelize the onions the fast way:
http://www.stellaculinary.com/podcasts/video/how-to-qucikly-caramelize-o...
 
Caramelize the onions the slow way: using your favorite slow method (45 minutes or more)
 
and see the differences between the two methods.
 
Suggestion 2:
Practice frying the onions, drain and dry/store the onions and use them as onion bits (like bacon bits) for salads, etc.
 
Suggestion 3:
Make Ice Cream from the onion bits (flavor the cream and strain through a chinois, which you will want to have anyway):
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0042KVL66/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=...
(link from Chef Jacob)

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Nina
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Joined: 2011-06-14 08:06

My French grandmother used to make (trying to be American) "Onion Pie".  It is actually a galette.  Very easy, and I'll bet that even your mom will over eat this one. 
Make a pie crust, center it on a baking sheet.  Fill with sliced onions leaving a 2" overhang.  Dot the onions with butter sprinkle with a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar.  Turn the overhang toward the center.  Bake at 375 F for about 20 minutes.  If you like onion rings, then you should like this.

"People who love to eat are always the best people." -- Julia Child

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Zalbar
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Joined: 2011-05-16 06:20

Start working on your stocks and sauces, that will use up tons and tons of mirepoix. You can reduce the stock to demi-glace or glace and it freezes very well.

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