CO2 Distilled Water Batter

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Chris Klindt's picture
Chris Klindt
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Joined: 2015-12-21 04:11
CO2 Distilled Water Batter

Hi Chef Jacob,

If you would, please look over my shoulder and see if you can see any really big mistakes. Thanks!

I want to make a carbonated CO2 distilled water solution (3 volumes of dissolved CO2) with alcohol and salt for a AP flour and rice flour mix for a deep fry batter.

My theory is the carbonic acid, alcohol and salt will interfere with the spring action of the AP flour gluten and break the gluten into small stands. The dissolved CO2 will expand when the batter hits the oil for a light crust.

My CO2 refrigerator seems to have an average of 34 F. This would be about 14-15 PSI of needed CO2 pressure for 3 volumes of dissolved CO2 in the liquid.

The recipe:

Water component:
Distilled Water 355 ml
Grain Alcohol (95%) at 10% 35.5 ml
Salt 5 g
The above is mixed together to be carbonated at 3 volumes of CO2

Dry Components:
Flour AP 142 g
Flour Rice 142 g
Egg beaten 50 g

All components will be conditioned to refrigerator temperature as well as the meat trying to keep as much CO2 dissolved in the liquid and flour as possible.

I am working with ions for polarity junctions so I may be out in far right field on my thoughts.

Thanks,
Chris

Chris Klindt's picture
Chris Klindt
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Joined: 2015-12-21 04:11

I had a huge error in the above post with too much flour mix. I have edited the above post. Nothing hurt at this point, I will just make a blended flour mix and save for another day.

Chris

Chris Klindt's picture
Chris Klindt
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Joined: 2015-12-21 04:11

Hi Chef Jacob,

My batter recipe with carbonated water (3 volumes CO2) and alcohol worked out really nicely for deep fried chicken tenderloins yesterday.

The recipe would be:

Flour/Starch 100%
Liquid, egg/distilled water 137%
Salt 1.8%

The carbonated distilled water, salt and alcohol hydrated the flour/starch really quickly. It seemed almost instantly even with working everything cold at refrigerator temperature. The chicken tenderloins turned out tender with an airy crust.

I do not work with batters much so my question is a thicker batter such as Chicken Fried Steak. Should I work closer to 100% flour/starch at 100% and 100% water?

Thanks,
Chris

 

jacob burton's picture
jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

You're operating assumptions are correct; alcohol, salt, and acid all impede gluten formation. I personally wouldn't add egg to the batter since egg adds structure, much like gluten. You'll also notice that in lighter batter approaches like a traditional tempura, other flours that don't contain gluten are added, mainly rice, and the batter is mixed right before using with carbonated water. This keep the batter light an airy because it doesn't give the batter time to form gluten structure based on hydration alone.

For a thicker batter like those used for chicken fried steak or onion rings, you would use less hydration and could play around with having more wheat flour vs. other pure starches, or even adding eggs.

Chris Klindt's picture
Chris Klindt
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Joined: 2015-12-21 04:11

Hi Chef Jacob,

Thanks for your reply.

I do not remember why I added an egg but I must of had a reason at the time when I was messing up with recipe. Mind has not been working good this week.

Seems like the reason for alcohol was acid, solvent, hydration and quick evaporation. Distilled water was for ion balance The carbonated water was for acid and CO2 release. Salt was also added to break the gluten strands farther. What I was after was a light tender crust that was airy and looked good with coverage of the meat.

I found a video tonight that you may like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfdRgtWWwQU&feature=youtu.be 

On a different subject, on your Tempura Batter - Simple and Untraditional  What was the reason for 1 T Baking Soda in the recipe? The is not enough acid in the flour and starch combined that would need that much buffer. I would assume that the baking soda is being used for a maillard reaction to give some browning in the crust. Is this correct or am I missing something?

If I am correct that baking soda was added for maillard reaction, do you taste a metallic or bitter taste or is the batter so thin that is overridden by the material taste?

Thanks,
Chris

 

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