Chinois recommendations

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luv2balive's picture
luv2balive
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Joined: 2012-06-22 17:43
Chinois recommendations

Hi All...I'm looking to buy a Chinois and am overwhelmed with the choices. Good quality is most important. Will be for home use and a low volume catering business.
Thanks!

GreenBake's picture
GreenBake
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Joined: 2011-05-15 22:37

I found this link in the Cauliflower Soup podcast page:
 
http://www.stellaculinary.com/podcasts/video/cauliflower-soup-recipe-video
 
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0042KVL66/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=...
 
Looks solid (I bought it from this link).

Marco099's picture
Marco099

I suggest these two brands for high quality:
 
Here's a fine mesh Chinois made by Linden of Sweden:
http://www.amazon.com/Sweden-Jonas-Stainless-Chinois-Conical-Strainer/dp...
 
Here's Linden's Conical strainer, which is not as fine a mesh for first round straining:
 
http://www.amazon.com/Linden-Sweden-Jonas-Sweden-Stainless-Strainer/dp/B...
 
Then there's this brand, which I don't know about, but has high ratings:
 
http://www.amazon.com/Matfer-17360-Exoglass-Bouillon-Strainer/dp/B00069Z...
 

Nina's picture
Nina
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Joined: 2011-06-14 08:06

If you're like me this piece of equipment has to take a pounding. I smoosh solids through, then bang it in the sink or garbage can. My advice is to buy something that is one piece solid construction. Anything that is pieced together will break. Linden is great, but the first place that I always go is your local restaurant supply. Go to any restaurant supply in the country and you'll find that they are all the same in that only men work in them, most of the traffic that comes into the place are men, and they just LOVE having a woman walk in. They fall over each other to help you. They are always very knowledgeable and friendly. So throw on a pair of heels and go shopping! LOL

"People who love to eat are always the best people." -- Julia Child

Marco099's picture
Marco099

 
Well, I don't have any female assets so my recommendations are from a happily married, male perspective who has long forgotten that many guys go weak in the knees for any living female organism. That said, I think Nina has a real point - shopping local is always good and if you feel comfortable "working it" to save a few bucks, you go girl. : - )

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