Wholewheat % in Sourdough recipe

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mesaboogieman's picture
mesaboogieman
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Joined: 2014-08-14 04:14
Wholewheat % in Sourdough recipe

Hi Jacob
Could you confirm that it is possible to use up to 20% wholewheat flour in a sourdough recipe without any negative effects and does this 20% include the wholewheat in the poolish starter.
From your 70% Hydration Sourdough boule recipe:
Total flour content including starter =750g
Therefore 20% Wholewheat would be 150g but the total wholewheat flour in your Sourdough boule recipe is 225g (inc starter) giving a figure of 30%

Have I got this right please?

Regards
Ron

jacob burton's picture
jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

Yes, you have it correct.

However, when you feed your starter with whole wheat flour, the hi-hydration and the enzymes from the lactobacilli bacteria will help to soften and slightly break down the grain. This is opposed to using a direct method, where all the ingredients are mixed together without prefermentation.

The 20% whole wheat threshold is more of a guideline, not a hard rule. So basically, if you're using whole wheat flour in a bread formulation and it's coming out a little more dense than you would like, check your whole wheat ratios. If it's more than 20% of your total flour, I recommend scaling it back to below 20%, just to isolate that issue and trouble shoot whether or not its the whole wheat flour causing the undesirable dense texture, or something else (fermentation, oven spring, under-over proofing, etc).

Also, if you want to make a sourdough loaf with a good amount of whole wheat flour (say 50-60%), I recommend that you use all of the whole wheat to feed your starter, giving it time to soften and break down the bran.

Let me know if you have any more questions.

mesaboogieman's picture
mesaboogieman
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Joined: 2014-08-14 04:14

Hi Jacob
Many thanks for your explanation, it has been most useful.

Regards
Ron

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