Thanks chef , I need help ...

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tony's picture
tony
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Joined: 2011-05-26 05:36
Thanks chef , I need help ...

Thanks chef for your answer about my inquiry . If i plan to make a starter with flour that has High gluten ( 14 % ) , only this flour in the starter , so i have to mix 500g flour and 500g of water . But i don't understand what you have said to me that i  may need to add a little more water (about 1-3% based on the baker's percentage)  , so 500g of water i will mix with 500g of flour , is there any more water or what ?
and also i have a small inquiry ...
Everytime i feed my sourdough starter , i have to remove half of my starter and feed the remainder with the same amount of flour and water removed ???
Also , the quantity that i removed everytime i feed my starter , i throw it in the bin ? or it is useful for something else ???

Finally , i want to say thanks for everything chef and sorry if my questions are strange or many or something else .

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tony
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Hey guys ...
CHEF , I need help .

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BrianShaw
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Joined: 2011-05-19 08:42

Ummm... I feel a sense of urgency here.
 
I don't quite know what your prior discussion was about starter ratios but I think what might have been meant is that 50-50 is a good starting point, but there really isn't a "required" formula.  It is a consistency based on feeling and you might need to add a bit more water (make a looser starter) to make it easier to work with.
 
Re: what to do with the excess when you feed... again, there are a couple of options.  Baking with the 50% you remove is one option, as is throwing it away.  Another option is to add the "feed" and just have more starter than you originally had.  The only negative abotu teh last option is that it takes more space to store.
 
Hope this helps. 

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jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

All of the formulations used on this website assume that you're using high gluten bread flour. Both the starter video and the sourdough boule video are using high gluten bread flour (just like you have). Follow these instructions and you'll be good to go.
 
When feeding your starter to keep it fresh, unless you're baking with it that day, you will need to throw some in the trash. Check out the comments in the sourdough starter video for some more ideas on what you can do with the starter instead of throwing it away: http://stellaculinary.com/podcasts/video/how-to-make-a-sourdough-starter...

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Hello!  I've been away for quite a while dropped in periodically but forget my password so never posted. With a renewed password I thought it wise to say 'hello' but it seems very quiet. Anyone else here?

Comments: 1

We are doing turkey and prime rib for thanksgiving, I am trying to decide the best way to minimize my work load since there will be 40 people and a lot of dishes so less to manage is way better. I want to do the prime rib at 132F and the white meat at 142F and the dark meat at 155F, would it be better to make the meat ahead of time sous vide and then freeze (or refrigerate) and then reheat at 120F or perhaps do the white meat and prime rib together at 137F and the dark meat in the oven?

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Looking on my sack of bread flour ingredients:

Wheat flour
ascorbic acid (dough conditioner) - this would be an oxidizer in the presents of O2.
vitamins
​Doh-Tone - this is a mix of different levels of amylase and protease. Some flour use malted barley flour or you could add diastatic malt powder

Leaving out the yeast and salt at this point because of heat.

Mix the required amount of flour and water for Chef Jacob's Baguette recipe together at room temperature and do a stepped mash of the flour in the sous vide cooker.

Comments: 2

Hi Chef Jacob,

My question is, have you seen a difference of adding salt with yeast at the beginning of a machine kneaded bread?

For better than forty years, I have added salt in the beginning of making a yeast bread in a machine kneaded bread to get the salt and yeast spread out through the dough.

In 2007-2008, I did a test of salt and yeast doing a bag test on a plastic bottle using a condom to look for CO2 pressure. One bottle had salt and the other did not not. The salt added seemed to create a little better pressure than without salt but this was only one test.

Comments: 2

Hi Chef Jacob,

I'm thinking of trying to make a more flavorful, more tangy starter. 

I'm thinking of using Bread flour, WW flour and some Rye flour... 50/25/25% - 100% hydration. 

Does that mix seem correct to you. I figured I would start it at room temperature and then after it gets active I would move it to the fridge to get more acidic acid in it. Am I on the right track? Is that too much Rye flour? 

Thanks for your input/help...

Wartface

 

 

 

 

Comments: 4