Whats Cooking? Something fine and fancy or just good and delicious...

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Mucho Bocho's picture
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Whats Cooking? Something fine and fancy or just good and delicious...

I wanted to start a fun thread for us mortals to showcase the things we've cooked. Please post what you've been up to in the kitchen. I'll start us off. 

Some deviled eggs topped with house cured pancetta and some ribs I made last night on my new Kamado cooker

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First of all, awesome topic and pictures. You know I love it when people post pictures of their creations to the forum. +300 Stella Stars.

Second, I just made some ribs and deviled eggs at our "American Classics" dinner last week. You can check them out in a post I just published: http://stellaculinary.com/blog/american-classics-reimagined-july-2nd-3rd...

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Chef Jacob, thats ironic about the deviled eggs. I should have made four dozen, can never have enough. I'll check out your American classic blog, I'm sure it will be educational. 

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Love to make deviled eggs with chipotle.

I've always found it funny that, often, people who say that they're watching their cholesterol by not eating eggs for breakfast that frequently will easily gobble up half a dozen or more deviled eggs. LOL!

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I was watching the modern mother sauce video and just saw some good poblano peppers in Toronto which are hard to find in Canada. I moved here from Arizona so Mexican food here is very disappointing. I roasted some poblanos stuffed them with a garlic, onion, jalapeno and shrimp filling on a bed of roasted poblano puree and topped it with diced tomatos and sour cream. 
 

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KBroiler77, Looks great! How did you roast the peppers? They can be delicate to devein once roasted huh? Shrimp look perfect. 

Not that you have to change a thing but a garnish of diced tomatoes, a little cilantro and maybe something textural like quick pickled small dice white onion or fried shoe string onions on top would go well too.

I'll take three please, tasty job.

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Here's a half of a Boston butt (money muscle) that I dry roasted on the grill and served like pork steaks. I'd do it again. 

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@ KB,

That looks absolutely delicious. Solid presentation too.

@ Mucho,

Very nice. Awesome trussing job.

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Hey Mucho,

I roasted the peppers on the BBQ and the covered them in a bowl with plastic. Yeah they are a pain to seed and devein so the ones that got too ugly went in the puree. I like the idea of doing a pico on top, I will do that next time.

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Breakfast on the BBQ

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Mmmmmm!  Got toast with jam, juice and etc....  One of my simple favorites.

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Jacob and Cohort (wikipedia definition),

I later thought about my previous comment concerning my use of the word simple, which doesn't always mean easy - specifically when cooking eggs i.e. fried, boiled, etc.  I read part of an autobiography on a roving cooks experience traveling Europe to different restaurants as an apprentice of some sort.. he mentioned a famous senior chef who tested his capacity for cooking a fried egg.  As I recall the chef displayed his excellent abilities i.e. speed, and accuracy almost all at once, deft moves etc..to demonstrate his abilities and raise the bar of who he would accept on his staff.  I think most home "cooks" can avoid the difficulties by cooking delicate items slowly, however speed and flawless "execution" might be another subject altogether.  Any opinion Jacob et al.  Also I typed eggs in the search bar on your site, however I did not find anything along this line of best technique for cooking eggs.  Did I miss something...I am interested in knowing the different/ways to cook eggs, which seem to be ubiquitous in many cuisines.  Oh and eggs are also useful as binders, leavening agents, on and on right....Thanks/Blessing, JCBaum

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JCBaum, Oh the ubiquitously incredible editable egg. Volumes could be written on them. Everyone has their way of cooking them. You're assumptions are correct. I've heard many a chef asked to cook an egg as part of the interview process. My little family of five eats about three dozen eggs a week so I've got to be crafty. The eggs I cooked on my Kamado cooker, we sunny side up but because they were really baked eggs, the yokes were custard like, soft but not runny. My camp was pleased.

Ways of cooking eggs:
poach--cooked in warm water bath
fried--cooked in butter in a low sided medium warm skillet
scrambled
Souffled
pressure cooked
hard/soft boiled

Happy Egg Cooking

MB

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Hey jcbaum,

I totally agree. I think the best way to judge somebody's skill at cooking is give them something simple. That way there's nothing flashy to hide behind.

It's kind of like judging a martial artist by the punch they throw. If you ask them to demonstrate a flashy technique on a willing opponent, it may be hard to gage how proficient they truly are. But ask them to throw a single punch, and you'll quickly know their level.

Cooking eggs is like throwing a simple punch; everyone can do it, but the level of grace and execution will reveal how good of a cook they truly are.

I've been meaning to put together an egg resource page for a long time now. Problem is, as Mucho noted, VOLUMES of information could be written on eggs. It's quite a daunting task from a content creation perspective.

But the egg resource page is in the works; I'm going to start with breakfast eggs and custards and work my way up from there. I hope to get the first content on eggs out by the end of the year (I know, sounds like a long time, but there is a ton of work that will go into this subject).

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PS: I owe Mucho some stars for starting this awesome thread and for all the pictures posts he's submitted.

+500 Stella Stars.

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BBQ Montreal Smoked Meat. 24hr cook at 200 degrees to an internal temperature of 195. Rested 4 hours to 160. Was the single largest piece of beef I've cooked yet, ~15LBS trimmed. 

Trimming the fat clods off without removing too much is so critical to the bark. Brain Sausage mentioned trimming the brisket to an even shape and removing any pieces that stick out is important to even cooking.

My method:
1.) Inject Brisket with meat curing ingredients (FAB, Sodium Erythrobate, Mortons Quick Cure, salt and water).
2.) Let sit in the refrigerator for 48HRS, overhauling every day. 
3.) Cover meat side only with Schwartz Montreal spices (from Schwart's)
4.) Cook on BBQ until internal temp came to 195, rest in cooler, wrapped in shrink, covered with a towel until internal is 160. 

Method passed the pull test. A good ole electric knife cuts pieces without any crumbs.

If you're saying, what's the difference between Pastrami and Smoked Meat, read this:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/06/difference-between-pastrami-smoked-me...

http://schwartzsdeli.com

Happy Brisket Cooking

MB

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Beautiful brisket Mucho with nice crust and color!

What is FAB? I cannot wrap my mind around it.

Did you build the end grain cutting board? Looks like Walnut with heart and sap wood. Beautiful piece of work with good glue joints

Thanks.

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If anybody has any questions about the curing ingredients I use. Here is an excellent primer

http://www.susanminor.org/forums/showthread.php?736-Curing-Salt

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After a day in the refrigerator drying I smoked them. 80 to 140 degree pit. 145 degree sausage core. Their drying now and need maybe a week or so to firm up and cure. 

Secret to quality smoked sausage. Immediately after smoking, rinse with hot water then submerge the sausages in an ice bath for 15 minutes. Then hang dry for a week, but could be eaten after a day. 

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I don't make a lot of casseroles or comfort foods but I was inspred by a TV show to make a frosted meatloaf. It was fun and my small village was pleased. Id make it again, maybe next time I'll make them in individual portions and use an aluminum foil band around it to keep the potato in place. 

Glaze recipe:
For the glaze:
1/2 cup catsup
1 teaspoon ground cumin
Dash Worcestershire sauce
Dash hot pepper sauce
1 tablespoon honey

Chef Jacob, if you used fancy meat and a tasty demi, might could use this at one of your pop-ups on a cold winter night?

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Damn, that looks delicious!

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Portuguese Linguica

  • 3 1/2 pounds pork shoulder or wild boar meat
  • 1 1/2 pounds pork fat
  • 34 grams kosher salt
  • 6 grams Instacure No. 1 (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon dextrose or white sugar
  • 10 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 1 teaspoon hot paprika or cayenne
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon crushed black pepper
  • 1/2 cup dry milk (optional – it helps the sausage retain moisture while smoking)
  • 3/4 cup red wine, preferably a Portuguese wine
  • Hog casings

As it cures dries over the next week, it will take on that classic red color. I'm going to smoke them too.

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Serious Eats Porkchetta (Mucho Bocho way)...

4 LBS 1/4 whole belly
Scored meat and skin. Rubbed a pork spice and 1 gram of Mortons Quick Cure on meat. Rubed salt and baking powder on skin. Rolled up very tight. 

Sous Vide 140 for 100hrs. Chilled completely
Shallow fry then heat in 375 degree oven until internal temp was 140.

Served with an apple Kale slaw with honey Dijon dressing and white bean puree.

The skin was almost too crunchy, but was rendered well. I had to break out the electric knife or it wold have broken apart when carving. Next time I make this, i'm going to peel back the skin on 1/2 of the belly but leave it attached. Like a flap. Then when I roll it, I'll wrap the belly around in two layers of its skin. Was tasty though. 


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This looks so awesome Mucho.  When I was in Hawaii, they have a version of "Portuguese Sausage" that is to die for. http://www.redondos.com/images/king_large.jpg has a picture.  I wish I could duplicate that taste though.

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Pancetta and Capicola. If its winter, then there's likely some Charcuterie or fermentation project going. I finished up last years pancetta so I thought why not. I've never messed with Beef Bungs before either so I thought, why not make a coppa. 

Here's a few shots of the belly, with the cure, hanging to cure after drying. Their now in the final stage of curing in the chamber. Be ready in a month or so. Start to finish about three months but I started with a 15 LBS belly so this should last me until next year. 

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Hi Mucho,

Your coppa looks lovely!

Did you use sucrose or dextrose with your cure #2?

The color looks good on the exterior. I bet the taste will be excellent!

I forgot to have the beef belly saved when I had a half beef side butchered but I told the butcher that I wanted the beef bone knuckles which got left of the list of products.

Winter is a great time for this type of product! 

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Chris, Thanks Winter is indeed Charcuterie season in my house. I actually used dehydrated glucose syrup, I like dextrose for sausage though. 

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Hi Mucho,

Looks like I have two added pictures now versus when I viewed your post earlier, now with interior cut meat.

The interior cut looks really nice with nice white fat and a good colored red of the meat!

For people reading this thread, the reason that Mucho and I are chatting about glucose/dextrose versus sucrose (table sugar) is because coppa is a fermented cured meat. The fermentation comes from the bacteria that is in the meat that consume the sugars for energy and reproduction to lower the pH of the meat for preservation.

What is interesting is that yeast love sucrose for a source of energy but a lot of bacteria have a hard time breaking sucrose down with glucose being an easier sugar to break down.

If you want a sweeter meat as a final product, combine glucose and sucrose in the fermentation blend in your recipe.

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@ Mucho,

Very nicely done! +500 Stella Stars.

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Thanks Jacob, but we ain't done yet. Decided to pull the Copa. I couldn't help singing a certain Barry Manilow song while slicing it.  Now I've got to get something else going. 

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That came out beautiful!

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I'm on a Copa kick. Just love working with Beef Bungs, they're so dam strong. Guess where I live, Attttttt, the Copa, Copacobana, where music and passion are always in fasion...

 

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