which bread book do I need

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Gadzik's picture
Gadzik
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Joined: 2015-03-19 23:23
which bread book do I need

Bread builders or Tartine's bread, maybe something else? I am interested mostly in sourdough open crumb boules, batards, baguettes and ciabattas. Which book will give me more knowledge.

jacob burton's picture
jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

Some of my favorite bread books include Tartine Bread, Bread Builders, and Bread Baker's Apprentice, just to name a few.

But with that said, I did heavily reference these and other books (as well as other online resources along with my own R&D) while creating our five part audio series on bread baking.

The audio series is extremely dense, and is meant to be re-listended to a few times during your bread baking journey. That coupled with our bread baking videos, is a very good place to start.

The Fresh Loaf is an awesome bread baking community, and I'm always here to help you on your journey as well.

While I do collect and read lots of bread baking books, I would say none of these books are necessary until you master the concepts outlined in my audio/video series.

Best of luck.

Gadzik's picture
Gadzik
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Joined: 2015-03-19 23:23

With so much knowledge available in internet for free is it still worth to buy a book? Will it give me more than reading forums and listening to stella's podcasts? The problem I have is a disproportion in prices and money we earn here in Poland. All theese books are 2x more expensive here, plus I earn about 700$ per month, so for me it is a big thing to order a book.

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Wartface
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Joined: 2015-02-11 20:41

Gfadzik... Having studied bread baking for 4 years I can tell you this. Bread baking recipes are a dime a dozen and there are 100,000's of them FREE online. Most bread recipes don't vary very much at all. Sourdough bread recipes are ALMOST all exactly alike. Hydration changes make the biggest difference. Slow fermentation gets the best results. Salt? No big deal... 1.5 to 2%. A pinch of starter and slow fermentation is better than lots of starter and a quick loaf. All of that makes a difference but... Knowing how to work your dough and knowing what each step is suppose to look like and how it's suppose to feel is the magic to making sourdough bread. That... Is free for the asking from Chef Jacob. Or you can read the thread on here about sourdough bread and digest all of the information that other Stella member have asked before. Once you've absorbed that data and made a few loaves of bread... You will understand why only beginners buy books about how to make sourdough bread. I suggest you also study Chef Jacob's video about the Bakers Percentage. Then... You will eventually compose your own sourdough recipes. Save the money you would spend on an expensive book and buy more flour. There... You have my studied observation and my opinion. Only through repetition will you ever become a good bread baker!

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strikingtwice
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Joined: 2011-05-19 07:33

Books are golden, sure, but you're right. If buying a book is a tall order for you, honestly, i'd suggest Jacob's info right here at home, and also www.kingarthurflour.com is a WONDERFUL resource for baking. They have a lot of 101 stuff also. I haven't been there in a while but the fresh loaf.com was always a good forum 

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Dave Mott
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Joined: 2014-04-03 15:34

I agree all around. Books are golden! How ever, I started my sourdough journey right here on Stella. I would suggest you do the same. Jacobs awesome and will guide you all the way with you on your journey.

Now I am also on King Arthur Flour, and always on The Fresh Loaf.

Cheers!

Gadzik's picture
Gadzik
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Joined: 2015-03-19 23:23

Thank you guys. I need lots of practice, thats for sure. I was hoping that there are some magic tips available in books only, but it couldn't be true ;)

Wartface's picture
Wartface
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@Gadzik... I highly recommend you watch Chef Jacob's video on how to make a loaf of sourdough bread and follow it to a T. You will become a very knowledgable sourdough bread baker after just a few loaves. I've shared that video to some friends that had no, zero, zilch bread baking experience and they cranked out great loaves of sourdough bread right from the start. That video was designed for beginners so it's exactly what you need now. Good luck and send pictures.

Port Street Brewing's picture
Port Street Brewing
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I'm a big fan of Ken Forkish's "Flour Water Salt Yeast: The Fundamentals of Artisan Bread and Pizza .  I'm a relative newbie baker but I think many bakers would benefit from Forkish's take on simple technique and long ferments. 

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Surfinjo
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Joined: 2016-08-07 15:20

I realise there are literlly thousands of books on the subject. I've bought a few myself, mainly from the more notable chefs. 

I realised early on though that what I really wanted was a particular bread which most suited me. It's a matter of personal taste.

There are probably more names for more different types of bread than most foods. 

One of the things I'm loving about Chef Burton's approach is the level to technical detail. Once I can understand why I'm doing each step, I hope I can be better able to adapt what I'm doing as my personal tastes change.

 

Newest Forum Topics

Hey is there a on line calculater for converting pounds in to grams, plus figuring the percentage of salts cure, sugar and ppm. The site i have been using is down, and not sure when it or if it will be back.

The site i used to use is diggingdogfarm.com.

I use it for my brines and making bacon cure.

I heard of some other sites which had something similar but I sure can't find them now.

Thanks kit

Comments: 2

The last four weeks, all but one of my loaves of "English-Muffin" Bread have turned out like this:

Prior to that, I hadn't had any trouble and I have not (knowingly) changed any ingredients, procedures or equipment. 

Why is this happening and how can I prevent it? Thanks. 

Comments: 5

When I was in Honduras and had made a side trip to Guatemala, I found a coffee jelly/jam that I eventually used for a new recipe I developed. Now that I'm back in the States, I can't get that jelly any more, so I have been looking into making some myself. 

Comments: 7

I've been developing a seeded multigrain sourdough loaf with considerable success, if I do say so myself.

I'm interested in putting this on a firm mathematical footing in terms of baker's percentage.

In addition to bread flour, whole wheat flour, and rye flour, I'm using pumpkin seeds, flax seeds, sesame seeds, cracked wheat, and medium cornmeal.

So do I add grams of the "extras" as I calculate hydration? Perhaps I count the cornmeal and the cracked wheat but not the whole seeds?

Comments: 0

I'm happy with my sourdough rye, but my wife would perfer a less dense version, something more deli like.  She also, however, wants not to reduce the rye-ness.

I'm using 1 part Hodgson Mill whole grain rye flour to 2 parts major brand wheat bread flour..  It's at 65 percent hydration.

So what might I do assuming that I don't want to change the rye/wheat proportion?  I figure that proofing schedule, handling, or hydration could be variables worth looking at  But there's also oven temperature and how long the loaf's under cover that might have an effect.

Comments: 0