Storing bean burgers

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strikingtwice's picture
strikingtwice
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Joined: 2011-05-19 07:33
Storing bean burgers

So last night, on a whim and with some stuff i had in the fridge, i just happened to make the best black bean adn brown rice burgers i've ever had. I plan on making them again in larger quantity and I was wondering with this sort of thing, is it better to store them uncooked frozen and then thaw and cook, or just as well to cook, cool, and just nuke to reheat? The morning star brand ones are already cooked i mean, i was just wondering more for storage if anyone had any opinions.

In case anyone's wondering, black beans, cooked brown rice (i think being cold and older actually helped), egg, i had some diced onion i threw in, and bread crumbs JUST to dry them out a tiny bit more. They should be a little wet. The seasoning was just some lawry's seasoned salt and fresh cracked pepper. It was good becasue they were very versatile and didn't have somethign like chipotle in them whihc sort of takes you in a direction. I sauteed some baby spinach and garlic, topped it on burger and crumbled some feta and broiled the feta. wheat bun with mayo and fresh cracked pepper. They were damn close to sellable.

lrsshadow's picture
lrsshadow
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Joined: 2012-12-17 17:13

Not sure, but I have frozen cooked hamburgers than froze in the past so I could take them to work and just heat them in the microwave.  They were good that way. 

Not sure about the veggie burgers you made. I think you would have better success with cooking and then freezing.  By cooking them first I think they would become more "together" whereas if you didn't cook them the freezing could cause the water to separate into crystals, when you tried to unthaw and cook they may not stay together well.

jacob burton's picture
jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

Sounds good. I agree with Irssadow on this one. A lot of the issues with freezing meat, especially after it's cooked, has to do with the formation of ice crystals. As the water in the meat turns to ice, the relatively sharp edges will cut the proteins strands, causing them to lose more moisture when thawed and cooked.

With the bean burgers however, I think you could easily cook them first, cool, wrap tightly in individual plastic wrap (or even vacuum pack), and then reheat for later use.

strikingtwice's picture
strikingtwice
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Joined: 2011-05-19 07:33

yea, that's why i wanted to ask, the ice crystals are something I was concerned with. Thanks to both of you for weighing in, that way i don't waste my next batch when I make them.

I think next time i'll try quinoa instead of the rice. Lot of versatility with bean burgers.

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