Vietnamese Style Baguette

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Anonymous's picture
Vietnamese Style Baguette

I'm interested in trying to make a Vietnamese style baguette for banh mi sandwiches and was wondering if anyone here has had any experience with them. From the limited information I could find on the Internet the basic difference between the Vietnamese style and the traditional French style is the substitution of a portion of your regular flour with rice flour, i've heard anywhere from quarter to a half. This is supposed to produce an airier crumb and a crispier crust. As far as I can tell, the cooking method is the same after that.

Will substituting some rice flour for the regular flour do this?

Will I need to alter the prep or cooking method?



strikingtwice's picture
Joined: 2011-05-19 07:33

I think it should be fine. The only thing I would look out for is the absorption rate of rice flour. You don't want it to be too slack or too dry. Also ive started onbaguettes recently. GET HOTEL PANS. I tried without them what a pain in the ass. Report your findings!

Anonymous's picture

Wiil do, thanks.

jacob burton's picture
jacob burton
Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

Try the formulation of 60% AP Flour, 40% Rice Flour and a 60% hydration rate calculated on the total weight of the rice flour and AP flour combined. An example recipe would look like this:

  • 600g AP Flour
  • 400g Rice Flour
  • 600g Water
  • 7g Yeast
  • 20g Salt

Follow the method shown in this video and you should be on your way. It's been awhile since I've played with this form of baguette but this should get you close. I'm planning on doing some more R&D on these this fall when my schedule frees up slightly.
Let me know how it turns out.

Anonymous's picture

Awesome, thanks Jacob, I'll try this weekend and let you guys know the results.

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Looking on my sack of bread flour ingredients:

Wheat flour
ascorbic acid (dough conditioner) - this would be an oxidizer in the presents of O2.
​Doh-Tone - this is a mix of different levels of amylase and protease. Some flour use malted barley flour or you could add diastatic malt powder

Leaving out the yeast and salt at this point because of heat.

Mix the required amount of flour and water for Chef Jacob's Baguette recipe together at room temperature and do a stepped mash of the flour in the sous vide cooker.

Comments: 2

Hi Chef Jacob,

My question is, have you seen a difference of adding salt with yeast at the beginning of a machine kneaded bread?

For better than forty years, I have added salt in the beginning of making a yeast bread in a machine kneaded bread to get the salt and yeast spread out through the dough.

In 2007-2008, I did a test of salt and yeast doing a bag test on a plastic bottle using a condom to look for CO2 pressure. One bottle had salt and the other did not not. The salt added seemed to create a little better pressure than without salt but this was only one test.

Comments: 2

Hi Chef Jacob,

I'm thinking of trying to make a more flavorful, more tangy starter. 

I'm thinking of using Bread flour, WW flour and some Rye flour... 50/25/25% - 100% hydration. 

Does that mix seem correct to you. I figured I would start it at room temperature and then after it gets active I would move it to the fridge to get more acidic acid in it. Am I on the right track? Is that too much Rye flour? 

Thanks for your input/help...






Comments: 4

Hi Chef Jacob,

If you would, please look over my shoulder and see if you can see any really big mistakes. Thanks!

I want to make a carbonated CO2 distilled water solution (3 volumes of dissolved CO2) with alcohol and salt for a AP flour and rice flour mix for a deep fry batter.

My theory is the carbonic acid, alcohol and salt will interfere with the spring action of the AP flour gluten and break the gluten into small stands. The dissolved CO2 will expand when the batter hits the oil for a light crust.

Comments: 4

Here is an interesting photo that I have interest in:

On the left is a 50:50 mix of canola oil and stove top clarified butter, like Chef Jacob mixes, which I really like. On the right is Glee which is what India likes makes.

The left mixture of oil on the left was used to check the oven temperature at 250 degrees F with a temperature transmitter.. The right is a picture of an oven safe kettle with the butter to kill two birds with one stone, so to speak.

Comments: 4