Scoring bread before baking

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lkassianik's picture
lkassianik
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Joined: 2012-07-30 14:30
Scoring bread before baking

Seems that as I raise the hydration of my dough, the more the razor/knife sticks to the dough when I score it. How have other solved this problem? I got a brand new razor and have tried various knives, oiling the blade, and dusting the blades with flour.  

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jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

Make sure that you're leading with the top, front corner of the razor. You can hit it with a little pan release spray if you want.
 
At the restaurant, because our environment is so dry, we will cover our baguettes with plastic wrap during the proofing stage. When we're ready to bake, we'll transfer the bread to peels and let sit, uncovered, for about 10 minutes, which is long enough for a slight skin to form. This makes the bread much easier to score.

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Ari
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Joined: 2014-02-11 02:59

Actually i'm having the same problem. it only happens when using the razor.
come to think of it, what is the point using razor if it works a whole lot better with a small paring knife,
what is you opinion?

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jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

My opinion is that I prefer the razor. It has a thinner blade, and for me at least, is easier to get the angle I'm looking for. Also, safety razors are cheap. You can buy a box of 200 for not that much. When one gets dull, you just throw it away and use a fresh one. Since you're pairing knife is used for other things, if its dull when it comes time to score the bread, you're going to have issues.

With all that said however, you can get good results with a pairing knife. If it's working for you, I wouldn't worry about changing it.

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Ari
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Joined: 2014-02-11 02:59

thanks for the answer, not so happy with the paring knife either, it's just that i never got it right with a razor. it's always kinda drags the dough and doesn't penetrate deep enough. also and what's the point of tilting it?

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jacob burton
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Joined: 2015-05-25 20:37

The point of tilting is it gives you a more severe angle. This is what forms the "dog ear" look on baguettes and other long loafs.

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Anyone have any experience of this bread?

It was very popular in the past. I recall, it was very moist, had a rich though delicate, dense texture and was very slightly sweet.

(Addition. I've also just remembered. The crust was firm but not crunchy and the loaf itself was quite heavy, perhaps equvalent to what you might expect two to weigh.)

It could be eaten without any butter at all, but was amazing with a good quality one.

I know it was made with whole meal flour (ie wheat germ) and included some malt syrup and milk.

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