Lodge cast iron loaf pans

6 posts / 0 new
Last post
strikingtwice's picture
strikingtwice
Offline
Joined: 2011-05-19 07:33
Lodge cast iron loaf pans

Anyone? I have 4 lodge pots/pans, so I know they're good. It's more of a question about cast iron loaf pans in general. I'm looking for sandwich loafs. I have a calphalon nonstick right now, meh. It's ok, i really don't love it, but it's not bad. The crust on my sandwich bread is a little crumbly. Not sure if that's something that a different material would resolve. Anyone care to weigh in?

GreenBake's picture
GreenBake
Offline
Joined: 2011-05-15 22:37

I can’t comment on nonstick loaf pans vs. cast iron, but rather on cast iron in general.
 
Cast iron pans are usually seasoned when you purchase them, but if the surface isn’t jet black and shows a brownish tinge with or without silver showing through, it needs to be re-seasoned. There are many methods for seasoning. I think giving the cast iron loaf pans a little extra seasoning would be worth the effort, especially for baked goods.
 
The Stella Cast Iron seasoning page is:
http://www.stellaculinary.com/blog/how-season-cast-iron-pan
and includes a link to a “new” method of seasoning cast iron with flax seed oil.
 
CAUTION: the smoke generated by flax seed oil is particularly (every pun intended) bad... Really, REALLY, REALLY bad. Don’t breath it if you care about your lungs, asthma or lung disease in the future. No joke.
 
If you can get around the problem with the smoke and wash any rags used in soap & water several times (the rags are very, very flammable), the coating is the best you can get, bar none. A flax oil seasoned cast iron pan or pot is a thing of beauty.
 
Check out the following links for more information:
 
How to Season a Cast Iron Pan:
http://www.stellaculinary.com/blog/how-season-cast-iron-pan
 
Sheryl Canter’s Blog Post on using Flax Seed Oil for Cast Iron Seasoning:
http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-...
 
Cook’s Illustrated post on using Flax Seed Oil using Sheryl Canter’s method (hint, the pan went through a dish washer and came out virtually unscathed) (membership required, but you can get a 14 day trial for free):
http://www.cooksillustrated.com/howto/login.asp?docid=26897
 
I hope this helps.

BrianShaw's picture
BrianShaw
Offline
Joined: 2011-05-19 08:42

interestingly, Cooks Illustrated rated Pyrex glass pan as their #1 choice in a "free" copy I just received, based on tests making cornbread.  Their opinion may have evolved over the years.  I'm not sure what the date of htis test was, however.

Nina's picture
Nina
Offline
Joined: 2011-06-14 08:06

  In brief, this is what Cook's Illustrated has to say:  They tested 10 pans made of a variety of materials, dark colored metal pans browned more evenly than light metal.  They hated glass, especially for sweet breads, like banana. 
  In the end they recommend metal with a nonstick coating.  Their favorite is Ecko Baker's Secret, guess the price!!??  A whopping $4.00!!!  Happy birthday to you Dave!
  P.S.  This equipment segment was written in 2008.

"People who love to eat are always the best people." -- Julia Child

GreenBake's picture
GreenBake
Offline
Joined: 2011-05-15 22:37

10-1/4 long x 5-1/8 wide x 2-7/8 inches tall [3.5 cup capacity, $20]
Here is the Lodge page on their loaf pans:
http://www.lodgemfg.com/seasoned-cast-iron/loaf-pan-L4LP3

12-3/4 long x 5-1/4 wide x 4-3/4 inches tall [6 cup capacity, $140]
Here is the Staub page at Williams-Sonoma (I couldn’t find it on the Staub website):
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/staub-cast-iron-loaf-pan
So that’s 1-1/2 inches longer, about the same width and 1-7/8 inch taller
The Staub pan has a matte enamel interior and a heavy cover. The Staub pan, though, is approx. $120 more than the Lodge cast iron pan

The Williams-Sonoma Goldtouch pan comes in 2 sizes:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/usa-pan-goldtouch-nonstick-loaf-...

1 pound pan [$20]: 8-1/2 long x 4-1/2 wide x 2-3/4 inches tall

1.5 pound pan [$25]: 10 long x 5 wide x 3 inches tall

LODGE:
10.25 long x 5.12 wide x 2.87 inches tall [3.5 cup capacity]

STAUB:
12.75 long x 5.25 wide x 4.75 inches tall [6 cup capacity]

GOLDTOUCH 1 POUND:
8.50 long x 4.50 wide x 2.75 inches tall [1 pound pan]

GOLDTOUCH 1.5 POUNDS:
10.00 long x 5.00 wide x 3.00 inches tall [1.5 pound pan]

lrsshadow's picture
lrsshadow
Offline
Joined: 2012-12-17 17:13

These are by far the best bread pans I have found.

http://www.usapans.com/

http://www.usapans.com/bakeware.html

I use the 2 lb loaf pans and have found that they brown the sides and bottoms of the bread the exact same color as the top of the bread.

The bread literally falls out without any cutting around or tapping. They are aluminized steel, made in the USA, and run around $15 to $20 per pan. Hand wash only.

I have also used the basic cake pan with much success.

When it comes to popovers or Yorkshire pudding I always use cast iron.

Newest Forum Topics

First, a quick intro, as I'm new to the forums.

Comments: 0

Hello!  I've been away for quite a while dropped in periodically but forget my password so never posted. With a renewed password I thought it wise to say 'hello' but it seems very quiet. Anyone else here?

Comments: 1

We are doing turkey and prime rib for thanksgiving, I am trying to decide the best way to minimize my work load since there will be 40 people and a lot of dishes so less to manage is way better. I want to do the prime rib at 132F and the white meat at 142F and the dark meat at 155F, would it be better to make the meat ahead of time sous vide and then freeze (or refrigerate) and then reheat at 120F or perhaps do the white meat and prime rib together at 137F and the dark meat in the oven?

Comments: 1

Looking on my sack of bread flour ingredients:

Wheat flour
ascorbic acid (dough conditioner) - this would be an oxidizer in the presents of O2.
vitamins
​Doh-Tone - this is a mix of different levels of amylase and protease. Some flour use malted barley flour or you could add diastatic malt powder

Leaving out the yeast and salt at this point because of heat.

Mix the required amount of flour and water for Chef Jacob's Baguette recipe together at room temperature and do a stepped mash of the flour in the sous vide cooker.

Comments: 2

Hi Chef Jacob,

My question is, have you seen a difference of adding salt with yeast at the beginning of a machine kneaded bread?

For better than forty years, I have added salt in the beginning of making a yeast bread in a machine kneaded bread to get the salt and yeast spread out through the dough.

In 2007-2008, I did a test of salt and yeast doing a bag test on a plastic bottle using a condom to look for CO2 pressure. One bottle had salt and the other did not not. The salt added seemed to create a little better pressure than without salt but this was only one test.

Comments: 2