Pots and pans for the home chef

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kc0kdh
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Ah yes, the old "do as I say and not as I do" approach. ;-)

Thanks Chef.
PamperedNonChef
Jacob,

If I'm seeing it correctly, in your videos you are using what the vendor I purchased mine calls a Fry Pan.  The saute pans have higher, straight lined walls, and have a smaller handle on the end opposite the main handle in the larger sizes.  Similar prices, though.  The saute pans do come with a lid.

I bought three sauce pans as well and they are great.  Heavy bottom, nice even heating.  Clean well.  Love them, especially for the price.  Good stuff, thanks for the heads up on those.
kc0kdh
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PamperedNonChef, I've noticed that too.  There seems to be no real consistency in how vendors and suppliers refer to saute pans, skillets, and sauce pans.  I thought I know what the actual definitions are, but I'm no so sure anymore. 
Jacob Burton
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Most vendors agree that a saute pan has straight sides and that a skillet or fry pan has sloped sides. I think this is absolute BS since there's no way you can't make a proper saute movement in a straight sided pan and I would never fry something in a pan with sloped sides because its very easy for the oil to splash up over the edge.

Also in a professional kitchen, a sloped edge pan is always referred to as a saute pan, never a skillet or fry pan. Since all the manufactures agree that I'm wrong, I guess technically I am; but I still think they're wrong and I choose to be stubborn about the issue.

In fact, every now and then I'll start an argument with a cooking store clerk for the sake of shear amusement. I'll lecture them regarding the finer points of a proper saute technique until their eyes roll into the back of their head and they give up out of shear frustration or boredom (usually the latter). I highly recommend everyone try this; great way to kill a Sunday afternoon (after football season, of course). ;-)
Nina
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You're not wrong Jacob!  I'm with you 100%  The way the pans are used is how they SHOULD be named.  It's only logical.  Manufacturers, and sales people aren't people using the products, so they shouldn't have an opinion.  yes

Zalbar
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Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but your vendors are actually correct, sort of. The name saute is the french word for jump and applied to the pan because of the action of food in hot oil, it jumps. What you might not have know is that there are 2 saute pans in french cuisine, the sauteuse and the sautoir.

The sautoir is the straight sided pan, while the sauteuse is the slope sided pan almost a pot. In North America it has been sort of just slapdashed onto what we now call a saute pan but more from a lack of understanding than anything else. The frying pan which we would use to saute things is called a poele and doesn't have the word saute in it at all. This is probably why saute pan was applied to the straight sided pan.

This shouldn't be confused with sauter as a technique, which refers to that manner of cooking.
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Jacob Burton
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Well, like I said, I'm stubborn! wink
kc0kdh
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I'm with you Jacob!  Thanks for the tip on how to drive a clerk nuts.  I'll have to give that a whirl sometime. cool
Jacob Burton
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Unless the clerk is Zalbar, then it's no fun at all. I guess you could always ask where they keep their bacon stretcher. ;-)

Then again, if the clerk can explain to you the French origin and meaning of why a saute pan is called a saute pan, chances are he probably knows about the bacon stretcher gag too!
Nina
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Chef, you must be referring to the Popeil Pocket Porkey Puller.  On aisle 5. 
kc0kdh
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LOL....Jacob & Nina, too funny!

Zalbar, thanks for the explanation, that's interesting.
PamperedNonChef
Didn't mean to open a can of worms....and saute them.

cheeky

I've always been confused between the three, really.  To me a skillet and fry pan seem to be basically the same thing, maybe with slight differences.  All-Clad sells a 'French Skillet' that looks pretty much like a prettier version of a fry pan.  Don't know if there's a true difference or not, or if it's just a nifty marketing trick.

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As a part time employee at one of those kitchen stores I resemble your remark. hehehe
wamoomaw
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I love getting these types of lectures at my store. It helps me keep customers informed.  :)
Scott Solomko

Very informative post.

 

I have been researching cookware for some time now and thought I would share (in an attempt to "payback" for the wealth of knowledge that this site has provided, thank you) what I have stumbled across.

 

When I first started my searching process I went down the All-Clad road. However, as I much as I enjoy attempting to cook (I am an amateur) I just could not justify the sticker price. What I discovered is that All-Clad runs a huge sale on their cookware twice a year, once in June and once in December. These events are held in PA. All-Clad sells what they call "irregulars". This is their cookware that did not meet their QA due to some aesthetic blemish. Discounts from what I have found run between 40% - 66% off.

 

I live in WI and with the events being in PA, I don't think this trip would be cost effective unless I was to purchase a lot of cookware. So I did some more searching and I found a company that sells these irregulars via their website. The discounts are obviously not as steep but still very good, if I recall correctly it is 33%. The name of the site is Cookware & More.

 

Then I found a restaurant supply store in my area and discovered cookware made by Royal Industries. I was very impressed with the weight, construction and tight fitting lids. So I did some more searching and ran across a site that carries Royal Industries and also Update International cookware. The name of that site is Food Service Warehouse.

 

When comparing the specs of these two lines of cookware, it appears to me that Royal Industries gets a slight edge. Simply because of thickness and weight.

 

I saw a post in this thread that associated 18/10 and 18/8 as a measurement of thickness. However, that is not the case. Those numbers indicate the percent of chromium and nickel in the stainless steel respectively. In order to determine the thickness and weight of cookware you would want to know its gauge (think electrical wiring). The lower the gauge, the thicker and heavier the material.

 

So I hope some of this helps somebody. Thanks again for the wealth of knowledge that you have imparted.

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