SNS 012| How to Reinforce and Reduce Stock

This video will demonstrate how to concentrate a stock by reducing and reinforcing its flavors. This concentrated stock can then be used to make "a la minute" sauces, such as a pan reduction sauce. Although this process is demonstrated with chicken stock, it is the exact same method used when working with other meat based stocks such as veal, pork and lamb.

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There are 17 Comments

GreenBake's picture

should the stock be reduced at a moderate simmer or rolling boil?

When I made some turkey stock in a 12 quart stockpot, a very gentle simmer reduced the level by only about 1/4 inch per hour... too slow for me. When I used a more moderate simmer, it reduced about 1 inch per hour. In my stockpot, that was about 1 quart/hour.

Would a stockpot full of stock (10 quarts?) reducing for more than 4-6 hours degrade the taste more than it would concentrate it? I was concerned that a rolling boil with that much stock (for an extended period of time) would hurt more than help. Just trying to find the right balance for concentrating stock just after it’s made.

By the way, I love the fast-motion food prep segments :)

jacob burton's picture

You can reduce right after straining if you like. You can also boil your stock as hard as possible during the reduction process as long as there is one small "cold zone" that will allow the scum to collect for skimming purposes.

When reducing your stock over a long period of time, the flavor will change, but not necessarily in a bad way. In fact, some chefs will reduce stocks for 12 hours plus. General rule of thumb; reduce as quickly as possible, but there is no "time limit" on how long this reduction process should take.

wamoomaw's picture

I just did this with some roasted chicken stock this past weekend. it turned out great! I ended up just pouring myself half a cup of the stock and sipping it down with was wonderful on a cold winter night.

LizAbbott's picture

Hi Chef,

 

What are some different and safe ways to store extra stock? Which are better ways to store it? I have experience in freeze packing, canning, and simple cold storage. I plan on making my first batch of home made chicken stock soon based on these videos and I know I am going to be making a lot and I will need to store it and just want to know the best way. We go to the butcher once a month and buy about 300 lbs of meat and break it down and freeze it and now that I know how to make stock I can use those bones to make stock with and store it in some way. Also how do they get chicken stock so clear commercially? I know it's more than likely not as rich of a stock, but I am curious as to how they do it.

 

Thank You

Liz Abbott

jacob burton's picture

One of the best ways to store stock is to reinforce it as shown in this video, reduce it way down until it will fit in a couple of ice cube trays, and freeze into individual ice cubes. Once frozen, pop them out and store in a zip-loc bag. You can now pull an ice cube or two as needed to make a pan sauce "a la minute" or reinforce a soup.

 

You can also pressure can at 20 PSI for 30 minutes at which point they will be safe to store at room temperature, in a cool, dark place for months to come.

 

Commercial broth is so clear because they first cook it under pressure which means the stock actually never boils and then vacuum it through a series of very fine strainers that pulls out all the particulate matter.

LizAbbott's picture

Hi Chef,

 

I absolutely love the idea of the ice cube trays, I just have to buy some....lol. I have an ice maker so I threw out all the trays.....lol. Making home made stock will definitely cut down on my food costs since I spend a lot of money on stocks and bullion. Great idea.

 

Thank You

Liz Abbott

jacob burton's picture

Once you start making your own stocks and keeping them around, it's hard to go back. Adding a concentrated ice cube of stock to just about anything, especially liquid based, will make it taste better.

LizAbbott's picture

Hi Chef,

 

My husband and I were just talking about what to do with the fat that is skimmed off of the stock and in your video you talk about saving it later. Then we saw another video that showed you using from the skimming in the reduction of the stock. My question is how do you properly make the skimmings into fat and can you do it with all animal fats? And is pork stock something that can be made or is pork no good for stock?

 

Thank You

Liz Abbott

 

P.S. Sorry for all the questions......but I do LOVE what you are doing here on this site.

jacob burton's picture

Yes, pork stock can be made and it is AWESOME!

 

For the skimmed fat, place it in a heavy bottom pot and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Once it starts to simmer, reduce the heat to medium low and continue to simmer until it no longer simmers. Basically what you're doing is boiling all the water out of the fat, but over a low enough temperature so that the fat doesn't start to break down. When the fat stops simmering, then you know that all the water has evaporated away and what you're left with is pure animal fat.

 

Strain through a coffee filter and allow to cool. The fastest thing that will turn fat rancid is direct light and oxygen, so store it in an air-tight container (a glass mason jar works perfect) and out of direct sunlight. It will keep for months and make everything you cook taste awesome.

 

At the restaurant, I try and keep various types of animal fats around because I prefer to cook animals in their own fat (duck in duck fat, chicken in chicken fat, etc).

 

Also, you can never ask too many questions. That's what this site is here for.

LizAbbott's picture

Hi Chef,

 

I have just one more stock question for you. My husband and I make rotisserie chicken quite frequently and are just curious if the carcass left behind from the chicken can then be used to make stock? We have a drip pan in our rotisserie that catches all the drippings and we usually just pour those over our dogs food (yeah I know adding insult to injury here) but can all of that be put into the stock pot to make the chicken stock? I think with all the seasoning on the bird it should give a good flavor. Just looking for your thoughts and ideas on this one. I'm just wondering if it would yield enough flavor. I was also wondering if any bones can be used for stock? Up until now all my bones have gone to the dog (I know more insult) and I would like to purpose them before giving them to him if possible.

 

Thank You

Liz Abbott

jacob burton's picture

Yes, absolutely.

At home, I'll just freeze all my bones until I build up a good amount, and then make a stock. Any bone can make a great stock, and at home, I'll mix and match too. So pork bones, chicken bones, steak bones, they all go into the same pot to give me a good home made stock that I can use for sauces and soups.

jacob burton's picture

Pour the drippings over your mirepoix for the stock and roast in the oven. The carcass and any chicken leftovers can be used for stock.

LizAbbott's picture

Hi Chef,

 

Love it thank you. I think Stock is going to be my biggest first make for a while.

 

Thank You

Liz Abbott

Esmeralda's picture

Just a short quick question (I have read all the comments I could about chicken stock, I think nobody asked this before, I hope I'm not repeating same question):

When you make a brown (roasted) chicken stock and you roast the bones in the oven, do you use tomato paste as in veal bones for veal stock?

And when you use the carcass of a roast chicken leftovers, can you roast the bones again? Or just boil and simmer them as in a white chicken stock? I know they are not raw but not really roasted either!

Thank you so much for your time and help!

jacob burton's picture

Hi Esmeralda,

For roasted chicken stock, you traditionally don't use tomato paste like you would with veal bones. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't, but it's just no commonly done.

At Stella, we don't use tomato paste in our chicken stock because I think the flavor is a bit overpowering.

For leftover, roasted chicken, you can either rub with oil and roast it more, or just make a stock with it directly.

When making a white chicken stock, you're starting with raw bones, so the blanching step is important to coagulate the proteins and render some of the fat, which yields a clearer, lighter colored stock.

But since the roasted chicken carcass is already cooked, you don't have to blanch it before making a stock.