Ingredients

How to Caramelize Onions in 10 Minutes or Less - A Rebuttal

 

This post was inspired by Tom Scocca who last Wednesday released an article on Slate.com alleging a vast conspiracy among recipe writers. He claims that the "Recipe Writing Guild" is intentionally deceitful about how long it takes to caramelize onions and it wasn't long until the "Food-Arazzi" jumped on the link bait bandwagon.

I disagreed, and this is my rebuttal.

Sources Cited in this Video

Oh snap hommey, you just got kitten memed!

"Oh Snap Hommey! You Just Got Kitten Memed!"

Sous Vide Lamb Rack with Pan Sauce and Sauted Vegetables


This video will take you through the process that we use to sous vide a rack of lamb at Stella. The nice thing about this process is we cook the lamb rack a second time in a reduced pan sauce which infuses both the lamb and the sauce with an amazing flavor.

Supporting Video Techniques

Sous vide rack of lamb how to plus time and temperature

This post is part of our ongoing Completed Dish Video Series, which shows you how to combine multiple techniques into a restaurant quality dish. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

 

Braised Chicken Thighs - Video Recipe



In this video we make a version of Stella Culinary's  most popular recipe, our "World Famous Braised Chicken Thighs." Since a lot of the SC community has already made the original braised chicken thigh recipe, we change it up slightly by using sherry wine instead of balsamic vinegar and fry whole cloves of garlic to make an infused oil instead of using blanched garlic.

If you want to hone your culinary skills over the course of a couple days, buy a few whole chickens and break the chicken down into its separate parts. Use the bones to make a roasted chicken stock which you can then use to braise the thighs. The following day, use the breasts to make a poached chicken roulade. Practice your sauteing technique by serving the roulade with sauted vegetables such as english peas, pearl onions, and/or fava beans. Sauce with a a reinforced chicken stock that's been turned into a pan reduction sauce to round out an epic training session.

Further Information

Simple and Classic Steak Tartare - Video Recipe



In this video I'll demonstrate how to make a simple steak tartare using the head and tail trimmings of a fabricated beef tenderloin.

What is Steak Tartare

For those who aren't familiar with this classic bistro dish, steak tartare is lean beef that is finely minced (sometimes ground), seasoned and served along side toast points. Classic flavorings and garnishes include minced onions, mustard, capers, worcestershire sauce and a raw egg yolk, usually served right on top. It's common to see steak tartare accompanied with toasted rye bread, such as our European Style Brown Bread, but is also great with brioche, crostinis or crackers.

Steak tartare is sometimes also refered to as "beef tartare," "tartare steak" and is sometimes spelled without the 'e' (tartar).

Health and Safety Concerns

Since steak tartare is prepared raw, it's important to buy high grade, lean beef from a trusted source and use within a day or two. Because bacteria is only on the surface of the meat, some prefer to salt the exterior for an hour and rinse thoroughly before dicing.

One must also consider that once the beef is either diced or ground, it will have more surface area upon which bacteria can grow. I don't say this to scare you, but just to stress the importance of paying extra close attention to your sanitary practices while preparing this recipe. Steak tartare is one of my favorite "power meals," and I happily eat it without a second thought of food poisoning (which has never happened). This is because I trust the source of my beef, make sure that it's fresh, and follow a few simple guidelines.
  1. Make sure that your cutting surface has been properly cleaned and sanitized before and after dicing the steak tartare. Same thing goes with the blade of your knife.

  2. Wash your hands thoroughly before and after handling the raw beef, using hot, soapy water and scrubbing constantly for 20 seconds.

  3. Work quickly and efficiently, exposing the beef to room temperatures as briefly as possible.

  4. It's never a good idea to serve raw or undercooked meat products to young children or the elderly who tend to have weaker immune systems.


That's it! Other then that, give it a shot and enjoy!

Related Content

The list can go on, but instead, what are your ideas? How can you take fresh pasta and turn it into your own unique dish? Let me know in the comments!

This post is part of our ongoing Completed Dish Video Series, which shows you how to combine multiple techniques into a restaurant quality dish. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

 

Pancetta-Parsley Sourdough Boule - Recipe

Pancetta and parsley are a great, classic flavor pairing, and when combined with our standard sourdough boule recipe, yields a special, delicious bread. Use this bread to accompany soup, make a grilled cheese or just eat as is.

How to Roast and Peel Bell Peppers

A quick video that will demonstrate how to roast and peel a bell pepper.

Technique at a Glance

  1. Roast bell peppers over an open flame or hot grill until the skin is charred black. Do not rush this process; the biggest mistake that most people make when roasting bell peppers before peeling is under roasting. A propane or MAP gas torch will also work.

  2. Remove charred peppers from flame, place in an appropriate sized container, cover with plastic wrap and allow to steam for 10 minutes.

  3. After steaming period, remove charred skin by rubbing the exterior of the bell pepper with a lint free towel.

  4. Seed and julienne.

Roasted and peeled bell peppers are great on pizza, sandwiches, hamburgers, mixed into pasta dishes and served on antipasto platters.

Related Links


For more posts just like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

Pan Fried Swai Fish Dinner | Cooking at Home


Hey everybody! This is the first video in our new series, "Cooking at Home with Chef Jacob." Since we've covered so much ground with a lot of our other technique videos, I thought it'd be fun to do a series where I am limited by my small and poorly equipped home kitchen, not to mention, my local supermarket that pails in comparison to most that you'd find in many urban areas.

In this video, I make a super simple pan fried fish with one of my all time favorite vegetable sides, roasted squash with garlic and thyme. I also make a quick lemon-tomato beurre blanc of sorts to round out the completed dish. From start to finish (once all your prep is done), it takes about 10 minutes to cook and serve and costs under $10 for 2-4 completed entrees.

What is Swai?

According to the Monterey Bay Seafood Watch List, Swai (pronounced s-why), is interchangeably used with the term Basa, which is a farmed form of river catfish imported from South East Asia. Swai is commonly available in most large supermarkets, but you can also use this recipe for catfish and bass (which are basically the same thing) or a thin, mild fish such as tillapia.

Since the above mentioned fish are thin and delicate, they are best sautéed or pan fried and cook relatively quickly. Dusting the fish fillets with a thin coating of flour and cooking them in a combination of fat and oil over medium heat, will help to brown the exterior while keeping the flesh moist and succulent.

Ingredients Used

For the Fish

  • 2 Large Swai Fillets (substitute basa, catfish or tillapia as desired).

  • 3-4 ounces of All-Purpose or Bread Flour, for dredging.

  • Kosher Salt to taste.

  • Freshly ground Black Pepper, to taste.

  • 2-3 ounces Canola Oil (or other neutral flavored cooking oil)

  • 1-2 ounces of Whole, Unsalted Butter

  1. Generously salt both sides of fish fillets with kosher salt and allow to sit for about 10 minutes. The salt will draw out protein rich fluids that will then allow the flour to adhere to the flesh.

  2. In the meantime, heat a large, 12" skillet over medium, giving the pan ample time to heat all the way through.

  3. Dust both sides of fish fillets with flour and shake off any excess.

  4. Pour canola oil into preheated pan, enough so that the bottom is covered with a thin layer, and gently lay in fish fillets. Give the pan a gentle shake to ensure the fish doesn't stick.

  5. After about two minutes, place whole butter in the center of the pan, gently shaking the pan as the butter melts.

  6. Turn stove temperature to medium-high, and continue to cook fish on first side until golden brown (about 3-5 minutes total).

  7. Gently flip fish fillets over using a spatula and continue to cook on second side for about 2-3 minutes or until golden brown.

  8. Remove fish to plate and reserve pan for beurre blanc below.


For the Beurre Blanc

  • 2 Whole Tomatoes, Seeded and Diced

  • 2 Whole Lemons, Juiced

  • 4 ounces butter

  • 1-2 Teaspoons of Sugar

  1. Immediately after removing fish fillets, return pan to medium heat, adding in seeded and diced tomatoes. Saute for about 15 seconds.

  2. Add lemon juice and sugar, and reduce until the liquid has almost completely evaporated.

  3. Remove pan from heat and whisk in butter until an emulsification is formed.

  4. Check for seasoning. If the beurre blanc is too sour, balance with an additional pinch of sugar. You may need to add a small pinch of salt as well for overall seasoning.

  5. Spoon over fish fillets and serve immediately.


For the Roasted Squash

  • 2 Zucchini, sliced into thin rounds

  • 2 Yellow Squash, sliced into thin rounds

  • 2-4 Cloves of Garlic, peeled and minced

  • 1/4 Bunch Fresh Thyme, Minced

  • 2-3 ounces Canola oil

  • 2-3 ounces Butter

  1. Heat a large sauté pan over high heat, and once hot, add canola oil.

  2. Place zucchini and squash into hot pan and sauté for about 2-3 minutes, or until some pieces start to slightly brown.

  3. Add whole butter and continue to sauté until the butter melts.

  4. Add minced garlic and thyme, and continue to sauté for another 3-5 minutes, or until the squash has cooked down yielding a soft texture that still has some structure (read "not complete mush").

  5. Season with salt and fresh ground black pepper and serve immediately.

  6. Total cooking time is about 10 minutes, so if serving this with the above fish as presented in the video, you can easily cook this on a second burner at the same time you're cooking the fish.


Related Video Techniques & Recipes

Composed Cauliflower Soup: The Completed Dish


In a previous video, I demonstrated how to make a cauliflower soup base. In this video, we will complete the dish by presenting what is called a "composed soup," where the garnishes are placed in a bowl and the soup base is poured table side.

Related Posts

The list can go on, but instead, what are your ideas? How can you take fresh pasta and turn it into your own unique dish? Let me know in the comments!

This post is part of our ongoing Completed Dish Video Series, which shows you how to combine multiple techniques into a restaurant quality dish. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

 

How to Prep English Peas

It's spring time which means English Peas are now available. This quick video will show you how to prep and blanch English Peas which is a necessary step before adding them to salads, sautes or applying a secondary cooking technique.

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For more posts just like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

How to Peel Pearl Onions


Here's a quick video that will teach you how to peel and blanch pearl onions. Once prepped, pearl onions make a great accompaniment to many saute dishes.

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For more posts just like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.
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