Asian Style Dice & Julienne | Video Technique

 

Holding A Chinese Vegetable Cleaver

I love using a Chinese Vegetable Cleaver for prepping produce. The grip I use is a modified two-finger pinch grip as shown in the picture below. The two finger pinch grip will give you greater control over the larger blade, increasing your cutting accuracy. If you're unfamiliar with the professional pinch grip, please watch CKS 2| Professional Knife Grip.

Rondelle & Bias Cuts

The first step of the Asian style dice and julienne is the simple bias cut, which is nothing more then a rondelle (round cut) performed at an angle.  Cutting on a bias will give you a larger surface area, and it also looks a lot nicer than a simple round slice.

Asian Style Julienne

To perform an Asian style julienne, take the bias cut that you learned above and stack on top of each other. From there, simply cut little match sticks to the desired thickness to finish your Asian julienne.

Asian Style Dice

To achieve an Asian dice, simply cross cut your julienne to the same thickness, yielding an even dice.

This post is part of our ongoing Culinary Knife Skills Video Series, which teaches you a wide array of knife skills used in professional kitchens. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

5 comments

tranceaddict
Chef,  I am impressed.  You managed to julienne that last set in 13s.  You're my hero.
Jacob Burton's picture
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Thanks Tranceaddict. All it takes is good guide hand technique, a relaxed wrist and a lot of practice.
beeenjjjippp
yeah that was a pretty badass juilenne at the end! Though, whats the difference in the end result between a normal julienne/dice and an asian one?
Jacob Burton's picture
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A basic European style julienne is longer and a little fatter. Also, because you first slice the vegetables on a bias, the end of the julienne has a bit of a bias slant to it, giving it that distinctive look that you're use to seeing in Asian style cuisine. When I need very thinly julienned vegetables for a garnish, salad or slaw, I prefer this technique.
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By the way, welcome to the site. Glad to see you come over from YouTube and join the Stella Culinary community!
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