Alligator and Kangaroo

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Zalbar's picture
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Alligator and Kangaroo

I've recently come into a piece of kangaroo and alligator. Not really big pieces, but I'm sort of clueless on what to do with them, or even how to go about cooking them. Anyone with any experiences with these proteins care to chime in?

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 My experience with gator is that people only eat the tail since that is the most tender part.  The flavor is comparable to frogs legs or........chicken...lol.

 

  I have only eaten it fried as you would do a fish fry.  In restaurants they usually serve it on a wooden skewer with a remoulade, or cocktail sauce.

 

  The only thing that I know about roo is that a few years ago McDonalds was sited for serving Kangaroo meat in there burgers and calling them "all beef".  So they just dropped the "all beef" claim.

 

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It depends on which part of the roo you have Zalbar. If it's fillet, treat it as you would a prime piece of beef. Roo steaks are similar, but not quite as tender as the fillet. In either case, it should be a rich-red colour and without the slightest trace of fat: kangaroo is one of the leanest meats you'll ever find. These cuts are  are mouth-wateringly delicious  If you briefly caremelise each side in a cast iron pan. I like to serve it with crispy potato slices and a simple sauce made from deglazing the pan with dry white wine (yes white wine) before adding an equal amount of fresh cream. Reduce, add finely sliced champignons, and an abundance of coarsely-cracked, black pepper.

 

Except for the tail, which is nearly always used for the classic "kangaroo tail soup", the other parts of the animal are usually subjected to marinating and slow-cooking techniques. I usually do a ragout.

 

I know nothing of cooking alligator, but I've eaten crocodile a number of times, and I'm guessing you'd treat both reptiles similarly. If you want apply the croc techniques to your gator, you can find  some very good (and important) tips, along with a number of recipes at:

 

http://www.australiancrocodile.com.au/images/Recipesandtipsforcookingcrocodilemeat_.pdf

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Nina, I can understand McDonald's being cited for false advertising, but that wasn't their mistake! They should have used "all roo" as a promotion.

 

By the by, I preferred your original (happy-lady) photo.

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As I watched the opening ceremonies, I wondered if you had any food/party plans during the Olympics. 

 McDonald's could sell it as "All roo all the time" or, "It's all for roo"

 

  I'll play around with my pictures.  Today, I can't seem to change my account settings.