Savory Crepes

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Nina's picture
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Savory Crepes

Hey guys, I'm planning a little brunch on Sunday and I keep thinking about serving savory crepes.  The problem is that I just haven't been able to come up with great filling ideas.  Of course the standard protein with a bechamel sauce, perhaps adding cheese and/or nuts.  Mushrooms in a sauce with a little sherry.............and, that's all I can think of.  Please HELP!!!!

I can't wait to hear the responses!

  Thanks, Nina 

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First thing in my head was roasted red/orange peppers (I like gypsy peppers) and goat cheese. Maybe with a sprinkle of toasted pine nuts on top? Lemon basil with fresh tomato. Pancetta, fresh white corn, and creme fraiche? It's summer. Vegetables have the starring role for me. If you like living on the edge of sweet and savory, try roasted beets chopped with peaches and more creme fraiche. (On a hot summer day a chilled roast beet and fresh peach salad with a touch of champagne vinegar is heaven, and the colors are gorgeous.)

 

I should never check the forum at bedtime. Sends me straight to the refrigerator!

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asian bbq short ribs...hoisin and stuff.

 

carved ham and beer/cheese/onion fondue.

 

typing one handed and sideways sorry no elaboration, but you got it. you're a professional

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LOL! GMTA, enilorac!

 

I, too, was thinking of roasted red peppers with goat cheese, but with my sun-dried tomato cream sauce:

 

Sun-Dried Tomato Cream Sauce

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbsp Butter
  • 2 Cups Chicken stock
  • 1 Cup Sun-dried tomatoes
  • 2 Cups Heavy cream
  • 1/2 Cup Basil, fresh chopped (or more, to taste)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. In a saucepan, sauté the garlic in the butter until soft.
  2. Add the chicken stock and the sun-dried tomatoes and simmer for 10 minutes.
  3. Add the heavy cream and the basil and simmer until reduced to desired thickness.
  4. Purée until smooth.
  5. Season with salt and pepper.

 

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Nina's picture
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Thank you all, I knew that you'd come through.  I love this site!

I just happen to be in possession of some beautiful peppers and goat cheese.  Labs, I saved your recipe.  It all sounds great.

@E, what are gypsy peppers?  I love the red and orange idea.

enilorac's picture
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Gypsy is a type of bell pepper (http://www.portlandmonthlymag.com/eat-and-drink/articles/0907-savor/). Gypsies have a more tapered shape, thinner skins, and very juicy flesh. They roast and fry up beautifully. The flavor is always good, even when they are green, but the fun thing about growing them is that you can capture different flavors at different stages. They have a yummy vegetable-y taste as green peppers, with none of the bitterness green bells can sometimes get, and they grow sweeter as they go along and change color. I tend to like them best roasted in the orange stage, where the veggie flavor and the sweetness are evenly balanced. Of all the peppers I ever grew, gypsies remain my favorites (and I wish I had a planter full now!).

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Thanks for the link Enilorac.  These look like what are sold around here as cubanelle peppers.  Either way, thanks again for your help.  How did you solve your stovetop dilemma?

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Enilorac, if you like experimenting with other peppers, try the South American pepper called chile manzano (which may also be called chile rocoto, chile locoto, chile peron or chile caballo, depending upon where you get them.  There are two varieties - each of which is good, but the one that turns from green to orange is more flavourful than the one that turns from green to red.

 

These can be pretty hot, but I've had some that were only medium-hot.  Either way, they have an interesting fruity flavour that is wonderful.

 

One of the ways of identifying these is that the seeds are black, which is something relatively rare among peppers.

 

HERE is a site with some good pictures of them.

Nina's picture
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They just have a look about them Labs.  Burn your skin off kind of look....

I like the black seeds.