Salmonella Risk

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kc0kdh's picture
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Salmonella Risk
I have left over flour breading from my pan fried Chicken I tossed in the chill chest for later use on some pork or cube steaks or some such thing.  While I'm aware of the salmonella risk, my thoughts are that any contamination would certainly be killed off during the frying process of the next round.  Is this a safe approach or am I off base here?
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As long as you're using it right away you'll be fine. Just don't store it and re-use on another day.
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Why? What's the danger in storing and using again in a few days? Also a follow up question: What are the chances of actually having a salmonella contamination in poultry? Of course we always assume the worst but just because you're working with poultry doesn’t mean it's contaminated does it?
Wisconsin Limey
It is better to assume that ALL poultry (and meats in general) are contaminated with salmonella.

142,000 cases of salmonella poisoning from EGGS are reported annually,  and 30 of these people die!

Risking death to save a few pennies worth of flour is not an option in my kitchens!

If you still need convincing here is a USDA Salmonella Fact Sheet
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Wow I didn't know there were that many cases.  Thanks for the link to the facts sheet, I'll take a look.  I always just assume all poultry and eggs are contaminated, but I just want to understand it better.  The eggs bring up anotheer question....when  we use raw eggs in cooking for things like dressings, aoli, etc what is the risk, and is there a way to avoid the risk?

Thanks Limey.
Wisconsin Limey
The risk in eggs is indeed small.  I would think most people eat eggs at some point in a year so 142,000 out of 300+ million is about a 0.0005% chance of getting sick and a 0.0000001% chance of dying.  Extremely small odds, yet 30 people do die!

I read somewhere that about 1 egg in 1000 is contaminated and that one egg might not have enough salmonella to make you sick.  If you made mayo with 2 contaminated eggs (1 in 1,000,000 chance of happening) you might kill an old person or a baby.

To be 100% safe, use pasteurized eggs.  These eggs have been heated to 138F - 140F for 3 minutes for large eggs, 5 mins for extra large.  This does not cook the eggs but it  does kill salmonella.

This is the perfect excuse to purchase a Sous Vide Supreme:  "Honey, I'm spending $400 on a gadget to protect our family!"
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Awesome, thanks. I like the approach on the sous vide, but it would probably get me killed.  lol
AlanF
Associated with the the salmonella talk...

Why can you eat/serve duck med rare, but not chicken?

I've seen a bunch of reasons on Google search, but they are all different.
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The USDA recommends that all poultry including ducks, geese etc...be cooked to an internal temperature of 165ºF

Given that, there is no official can about it and it's all about preference and diner discretion. Pink duck tastes great and has great texture. Ever eaten some undercooked chicken? It's gross. However you're not supposed to be serving it pink.

Other than that I'm not sure if there's a right answer to your question.
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AlanF
I was just curious. 

I guess my perception was that people don't eat undercooked chicken more for health reasons than anything else.  I've never eaten undercooked chicken or mid-rare duck (haven't eaten a ton of duck), so I have no frame of reference...

Been wanting to pick up some duck breasts to experiment with and wanted to know if duck that's cooked through just comes out too dry, which is why it is prepared mid-rare to medium...

If you do an internet search, there are a hundred different reasons why people think you can serve mid-rare duck.  Some claim that duck is closer to a red meat than poultry, others due to the way that commercial chickens are raised versus duck....
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I forget If I've asked this on this forum (maybe in its previous incarnation) or not, so I'll ask it anyway: What would your opinions be of either of the following?

Stovetop: (Source: HubPages)
How to pasteurize an egg

The following information is the technique needed for the pasteurization of an egg, and you can use this technique for any mayo recipe.

Separate your yolks from your whites, and reserve the whites for another usage. Place the yolks gently into a metal mixing bowl filled with a bit of cold water. You can also use the top of a double boiler if you have one. By gentle as you don't want to break the yolks!

Heat some water on the stove in a pot that your bowl will fit nicely atop of, and heat this water to a gentle simmer. Place your bowl with the eggs and water over the simmering pot, and heat the water in the egg bowl up very gently.

The temperature of pasteurization is between 52 and 58 degrees Celsius, and any higher than that will start to cook your eggs, so you need to be somewhat precise.

Insert a standard thermometer (your standard 2$ school laboratory thermometer will work well here) and watch closely for the temperature to rise to the desired point.

When the water reaches 55 degrees, turn off the heat, but let the bowl continue to sit ion the hot water pot. Wait 5 minutes with the egg water at 55 degrees, and your eggs have been pasteurized, and are bacteria free.

Add a bit of cold water (too make it a little easier on your hands), and then drain off all the egg water, using your hand as a strainer, to keep the egg yolks in the bowl. Use right away for mayonnaise, or refrigerate until needed.

Mayonnaise made with these eggs, and then stored in the fridge will be completely safe, but incorrect storage of any mayonnaise can allow for the growth of new bacteria.

Microwave: (Source: About.com)
How To Make Pasteurized Eggs

IMPORTANT: You'll need no fewer than three clean whisks on hand to use this procedure. (Clean forks are OK, too.)
Difficulty: Average
Time Required: 5 minutes
Here's How:
  1. Separate two eggs and collect the yolks in a microwave-safe glass bowl. Whisk the yolks thoroughly using the first of your three clean whisks.
  2. Add 1 Tbsp lemon juice and whisk again.
  3. Add 2 Tbsp water and whisk again. Seal bowl with plastic wrap and place it in the microwave.

    NOTE: The current whisk should be set aside now. You'll need to have the next two ready to go in quick succession.
  4. Heat the egg mixture on high until the surface begins to rise. Once you see this, cook for 8 more seconds, then immediately remove the bowl from the microwave, remove the plastic wrap and whisk the yolks vigorously with a clean whisk.
  5. Immediately return the bowl to the microwave and heat on high again until the surface begins to rise. Continue for 8 more seconds, them remove and whisk vigorously with another clean whisk until the mixture is smooth and creamy.
These egg yolks are now safe to use in mayonnaise or other raw-egg preparations.

Tips:
  1. You can increase the number of yolks to three. Just increase the cooking times to 10 seconds from the moment the surface of the eggs starts to rise.
  2. Three whisks (or forks) are absolutely essential. Don't try to wash and dry the same whisk and re-use it. It'll take too long and the temperature of the eggs will fall too fast. And by no means should you use an unwashed whisk for the second or third whiskings. You'll just be contaminating the egg mixture.
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Wisconsin Limey
Wouldn't it be much easier to simply:

1) fill a small cooler with hot tap water
2) add boiling water to bring the temp up to 138F/58C
3) drop in 3 room temp eggs
4) wait 5-10 mins
5) pull out your pasteurized eggs!

QED
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I actually almost died when i was 8 years old from salmonella!!

 

My mom defrosted a whole bunch of chickens in the kitchen sink and apparently the sun hit the chicken (through the window during the day) for a few hours and poisoned the chicken.

 

We all got really sick, but i got it the worst, i was in an intensive care unit for almost 6 weeks.

 

I still remember so vividly crying for food when I would see people eating on the television.

Not fun!!

 

Crazy times!

 

... I would rather dump the leftover breading and not take the risk!

 

 

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