Pizza Dough Mix

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strikingtwice's picture
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Pizza Dough Mix

Hey everyone. Any ideas on what mix of flour to use for pizza dough for some different flavor? I am using Lahey's no knead dough from my bread. I have mixed my different flours, and it's good every time, i was just trying to get a poll. The flours I have and use are:

  • Sir Galahad (King arthur's professional bakery all purpose)
  • Special Patent (King arthur's prof bakery higher protein/gluten mix)
  • Extra fancy durum
  • A coarser ground semolina
  • King Arthur White whole wheat

I just dump stuff until i get to the weight for my ratio, and it's always different. King arthur actually has a Pizza Blend and I'm curious to know what their using for the mix.

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Dave

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Can't really say that I'm really picky about my pizza dough. It's my basic bread dough with oil added to the mix. Gives me a great risen chewy crust which is my preference.

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I took a class last week from a chef of an Italian grocery store in the North End of Boston and here is his recipe for dough.  His secret is that you make portions of dough and let them bulk ferment in the refrigerator for 3 - 5 days before baking.  Excellent crust.

 

1 pound (1/2 bag) of Antimo Caputo Tipo 00 flour

1 teaspoon active dry yeast

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/ 1/4 cups to 1 1/2 cups of water

2 Tbl EVOO, plus 1 tsp to oil bowl

 

It's not that important to get exact measurements of the flour as you need to do the mixing by feel.  So start with the 1 1/4 cups of water in a bowl and add the yeast and salt.  Also, not a problem to add the salt at this point as autolyze is not critical here.

 

Add the oil

 

Start adding in the flour a little at a time, mixing with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula until the ball of dough is not so moist and you can work with it.  Depending on humidity, you can add in some more of the water.   The key is to be able to feel the dough as you work with it so it is easier to knead.

 

Once at the point that you feel you can knead the dough (+/- the lb of flour) then knead on a work surface until the ball is satiny smooth (5-10 mins.)

 

You can either place the ball in an oiled plastic container at this point, cover and store in the fridge for 3-5 days or just let it sit in an oiled bowl covered with plastic wrap for 4-8 hours and let it rise at room temp.

 

This makes two 12 in pizzas.

 

This was a Margherita with homemade sauce, sliced Taleggio cheese, shreedded aged Parmigiano Reggiano and fresh basil with some EVOO on top.

 

 

Bake on parchment paper covered with semolina and placed on a pizza stone at 500 deg for about 4 minutes.  Check the bottom and let bake for another 3-4 minutes until the bottom is browned.

 

 

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Elliot

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Hi Dave,

 

I really like Lehmann's Pizza Dough calculator for calculating my bakers percentage based on pizza size and thickness. Like Elliot I let my dough rise in the fridge for a number of days. I use a KA stand mixer to mix the dough till smooth, let it rise for an hour, then divide into portion sizes, make round boules and place in a tupperware container in the fridge.

 

I, like you, have experimented with a number of flours and for oven temps of under 500F (260C) I like an equal combination of KAF Sir Lancelot (prof high gluten flour) and fancy(patent) durum flour baked on a stone for about 8 minutes, like Elliot. I like thinner, chewy crusts. I have a stone on my outdoor grill and it can reach temps over 700F (370C) and when I do that I take any sugar and olive oil out of the recipe. I find the higher gluten flours char too much and use KAF Sir Galahad then. I have to see if the local Amish store can order some Caputo OO as per Chef Jacob and others, works best in wood fired and other hot ovens.

 

Now cheeses for pizza are a another whole thread. ;-)

 

BTW, nice looking pizza Elliot!

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That's a cool calculator.

 

I just finished doing a few months of Pizza R&D for a class I had about two weeks ago. Was able to develop a really nice Sicilian, New York knock off, true Neapolitan and Chicago Style. I have to organize my notes, but I hope to post the recipes with corresponding videos soon.

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Hey all. Thanks for the replies.

 

Eric, Nice looking pie. What are your results like when using the paper on the stone? Doesn't that defeat the purpose of the stone though? Does it still draw out moisture the same? Anyone else care to chime in on that?

 

Also, I see a lot of people here are using 00 in their home ovens, are you cutting that in, or using all 00? No real benefit on lower temp ovens? 

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I find that 00 pizza flour doesn't work that great for home applications because the flour is specifically formulated for high temp hearth ovens, usually above 750F+. It is possible to replicate a Neapolitan Style pizza some-what closely in a home oven, but unless you're getting a deck temp above 650F I find bread flour to work better.

 

When making a Sicilian style pizza at home I'll build it on parchment paper and then transfer it to the stone with the parchment still in place. The parchment is there just to make the transferring easier and I don't find that it reduces the browning of the crust.

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@strikingtwice

 

I use the parchment paper to make the transfer easier.  I have used no parchment as well with no loss in quality of crust.  The parchment is just a lot easier and less messy.

 

I use the 00 and find the crust to be superior to bread flour although I only get to 500 degrees; probably 525 with the convection oven setting.  Perhaps its the mix I use (salt, yeast, oil, water) and/or the bulk ferment for 5-7 days in the fridge.

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@ Elliot,

 

The extended rest in the fridge could be breaking out more sugars that allow for browning. I'm not sure. With all the tests I've done, I couldn't ever get the bottom crust to brown enough before the cheese on the top became too dark (not necessarily burnt, I just prefer my cheese to be more melty then brown). The crust was still a golden brown, just not as much as I would prefer.

 

Whether cooking it in a wood fire or a home oven though, the 00 does give the crust a unique "chew" which to my knowledge can't be recreated using other forms of flour.

 

That's a great looking pizza though so obviously you've found a way that works.

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Good points Jacob.

 

Remember, you dont have to put the cheese on at the start which helps balance out the browning of the crust vs. browning of the cheese.  The crust with sauce can go for about 4 mins before adding the cheese for another 3-4 mins.

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in my oven i always par bake my crusts. when i grill with stone in grill i do not. I've been afraid to use this new fibrament stone on the grill because I'm unclear what the stipulations are, and I really love it and I'm not looking to crack it. It can go up to absurd temps that i would never get, but i feel like putting iton the grill grates would not be good. Foil balls under the four corners maybe? 

Wisconsin Limey

I like to freeze the grated cheese and other toppings for 30 mins, it takes longer to brown, giving the crust more time to crisp.

 

Keeping it simple, my fav hand mixed dough recipe:

 

3 C (15.5 oz) bread flour

10 oz San Pelligrino sparkling water

1 t sea salt (Mediterranean) 

1/4 t yeast granules (instant or dry active)

 

Mix together and knead for a couple minutes.  Oil, cover and refrig for 3 days.  Makes an amazing "Hand Tossed" dough.  Cook on a stone at 550F with frozen toppings!

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Good points on adding the cheese latter, par-baking and freezing the toppings.

 

When creating dough recipes for my class I wanted to be able to stretch the dough, top and bake like you would in a normal pizzaria. The par-baking just felt like cheating for me, especially with the Chicago Style crust. (I know, me, Mr. Xanthan gum, all of a sudden having issues with culinary cheating).

 

Not saying I'm against cheating, I just wanted to develop recipes that if at all possible, didn't require par-baking or freezing of ingredients. I have to say, the recipes that I came up with are pretty good.

 

Hopefully I'll have time to post them soon; this week is going to be an ass kicker though. ;-)

Wisconsin Limey

It's not hard to bake great pizza when you have a WFO!

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Oh man is the WFO awesome. We shut her down during the summer though so we can make the indoor seating bearable.

 

Looking forward to testing my Neapolitan crust on a raging, coal fired weber though to see if any changes are necessary.

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PS: You have to build yourself a WFO Limey! Circulators and chamber sealers are all well and good, but a wood fired oven is the ultimate kitchen toy. It would be a perfect summer project for a handy man like yourself!