Fuel for new stove?

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CJ
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Fuel for new stove?

Hey guys.  I am finally moving and in the process of getting my new range/oven.  I will be in a rural area so my choices for fuel (heat) is either electric or propane.  I am not thrilled about electric but feel I may not have a choice.  Does anyone have any experience with using propane?  Pro's and Con's?  I am looking at  Montague, Viking etc.  Any thoughts and ideas would be appreciated.  This is a big step and an expensive one so the choice process is critical.  Any ideas would be welcome.

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Chris

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I have the same options and use propane. My old Frigidaire stove has four 9,000 BTU burners. I think the most I have seen in a propane burner is 12,000 BTU, but those are standard brands, not a Montague or Viking.

 

While a 25,000 BTU burner, like on a Montague, would be nice I can carmelize a large onion in just over 10 minutes. 

 

I like the control of a gas flame over an electric burner, though I have never tried an induction burner, which many rave about. 

 

Another benefit to propane is you can use it at all times, even during power outages.

 

HTH.

CJ
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Thanks HTH.  You have been very helpful.  As it is, I am leaning toward the Viking with LP top and electric oven combination.  Pricey but given my age and the durability of these things my kids will have to worry about replacing it. :)

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If you can afford a duel fuel, Viking 6 to 8 burners, I'm moving in!  Seriously, I believe that would be the best of both worlds.   A few years back we lived on Cape Cod where winters can be rather brutal as far as freezing temps, snow and ice.  At that time I used propane  as fuel and we never had a problem with it.  I mention the Cape because with the consideration of propane you must also consider your rural location.  Our tank was filled once a month.

 

At the present time we have no choice but electric, so we bought an  Electolux induction range.  In many ways I like it better than gas.  I wrote all about the pros and cons somewhere in this forum.  Check it out.

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CJ
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Thanks Nina.  You are always informative and helpful.

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Also check the cost of using each option.  For example, where I live (Honduras - in a city but, admittedly, within a third-world country), my cost of living would greatly increase were I to use electric, instead of propane - and that means ANY electric stove.  Even if I could get a reasonably priced induction stove, here, the difference in cost between electricity and propane is so much that an induction stove wouldn't leave me money to buy the food to cook on it.

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CJ
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That is true.  For me, I much prefer the flame but both energy sources are easily available.  It is difficult for me to guage the cost, though, because I have never cooked with gas or electric in the new location and I cannot really compare with others because I cook a lot more than the average guy does and I will be cooking for more people than the average person too.  I do know that electric outages are more common in the new location so that puts a check in the LP column. :)  Thanks for the input.  This is all good stuff.  Thanks tons.

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@CJ,

 

I have had a Viking 6 burner stove in the past (gas) and really liked it.  I have to admit though, that not only was it rare that I needed six burners, but if I did, there usually wasnt enough room to fit six pots/pans on the stove without them bumping into each other.  How can you really manage six burners anyway?  The only drawback was the exhaust which was built into the unit and sucked the exhaust down into the island unit and vented to the outside.  I prefer an above the stovetop exhaust.

 

I now have a Thermador 4 burner unit (gas) with an electric convection oven in our  Boston condo.  The exhaust is above the stove top and works well, unless of course I am searing off some protein and the smoke alarm goes off (I have since taken the battery out which I know is wrong.)

 

In Maine we have a Fisher Paykell propane  five burner unit.  The fifth burner is a for a wok and puts out over 19,000 BTU's, which you need for wok cooking.  Like Nina says, in the Northeast, you have to worry about power outages in the Winter (strong summer storms as well).  Propane is cheap and it gets filled regularly by the oil company.  

 

I have never liked electric ranges, but I have never cooked on an induction stove.  Nina is usually spot on with her recommendations, so I would be willing to give it a try.  With gas, you definitely need the maximum amount of BTU's you can get as you want the skillets to heat up quickly, so maybe that should be your determining factor.

 

Good luck! 

 

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Elliot

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Let me just say one thing.

 

Propane stoves don't stop working because of power outages.

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