Dobos Torte

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Dobos Torte
Good Day,
I am in search of a recipe for Dobos Torte as close to the original as possible. If anyone can help me with this it would be greatly appreciated.
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@ Louis,

Welcome to the forums. The guy to talk to around here is Labradors; sort of our defacto south american food expert. There's some other real smart people on the forum that might also know a good recipe for this.

Good Luck!

Jacob
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Well, I know enough about Latin-American food to know that Dobos Torte is Hungarian. I DO happen to have a Hungarian cookbook, though, and it IS in there but it's rather lengthy for me to enter right now, so I'll take a look at it tomorrow.
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My mistake. I read Torte as "Torta." Either way though, I was right! Labradors is your man. ;-)
labradors's picture
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Actually, it IS "torta" in Hungarian.  Don't ask me much else about the Hungarian language, though.  LOL!
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OK, I'm tapping out. If you have a question on American, Asian or European Food, come wake me up, (unless you want to know about what they eat in the Midwest, then go bug Wisconsin Limey). Lab, I assume you'll take it from here. Thanks! ;-)
Wisconsin Limey
Labs, I knew you were hungry,  I didn't suspect that you were Hungarian!  :)

This looks like a pretty good recipe.  

Here are some more...

BTW  In the Midwest, we eat sausages!
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I'm not Hungarian, Limey - just happen to like their food! LOL!

Okay. Here's what the book had, including the introductory information. I'm glad I read that part, since it does mention that it “works exceptionally well with American ingredients” and was “ developed by [her] friend Margaret Simon.” Thus, it is NOT the absolute original.

Still, when searching for further information about the original, I did find THIS, which mentions, “The great problem is that there are now many versions and everyone swears that theirs is the original. Clearly they cannot all be the original, and we can no longer consult the chef to find the answer.” It does, however, provide a link to a recipe that is very similar to (though not exactly the same as) this one.

Enjoy!

The following recipe is from The Hungarian Cookbook by Susan Derecskey.

Dobos Torte
DOBOS TORTA
(doh-bosh tor-ta)

A musician friend of ours from Budapest insists, historical evidence to the contrary notwithstanding, that this cake got its name because it looks like a drum (dob in Hungarian). But he is wrong: this is one of the few desserts that was named for its creator and not its appearance or the celebrity it was created to honor. József Dobos was a well-known nineteenth-century pastry chef and gourmet who owned a famous delicacy shop in Budapest. Some say he invented the torta in answer to a challenge that he make a cake that would become famous the world over. The story has to be apocryphal, for that is exactly what happened. Dobos torta, six thin layers of sponge cake with light sweet chocolate cream between them and hard caramel on top, has lived to be nearly a hundred. It first won international acclaim when Dobos. served it at a restaurant he opened near the Városliget park in Budapest in time for the National Exhibition which was held there in 1885, and it has been imitated everywhere, ever since. Though the original recipe has long been available, Hungarian chefs and cooks treasure their own individual versions. This one, which works exceptionally well with American ingredients, was developed by my friend Margaret Simon, who makes the best Dobos torta I have ever tasted this side of the Danube. Here or there, the pleasure of eating Dobos torta can be prolonged by a sip of Tokay Aszú after the cake.

To make a Dobos torta at home takes a light hand and a lot of patience. The results are sensational, a clear -case of culinary virtue amply rewarded. For a full measure of success, l would advise the home cook to take three precautions with this cake: one, do a dress rehearsal for the family before making it for company; two, make some extra batter so that any layers that curl can be discarded; and three, bake the layers one at a time, since most home ovens heat very unevenly. That first try may produce layers that look like warped phonograph records, but the cake will still taste good, and with a little practice any reasonably skilled cook should be able to put on a pastry-shop performance and produce a cake that is quite mystifyingly rich and light at the same time. (The following recipe is for a round cake. To make an oblong Dobos strip, increase the ingredients to 9 eggs, 1 scant cup of vanilla sugar, and 1 1/2 cups plus 1 tablespoon of flour. Spread the dough very thinly in two jelly- roll pans, bake it, and when it is done, cut each cake across in three even pieces. Fill and top it as in the master recipe, but score the top layer in rectangles about 2 by 4 inches in size.)

THE CAKE
Butter [as needed for greasing the pans]
6 eggs, separated
Salt
Scant 2/3 cup vanilla sugar
1 cup sifted all-purpose flour

Prepare six 9-inch cake tins for baking: cut 6 circles of waxed paper, brown paper, or baking parchment to fit the bottom of the pans, grease the bottom of each one with butter, place the paper in, and grease that as well. Set the pans aside until ready to use. Preheat the oven to 400°. Beat the egg whites with a pinch of the salt until foamy; continue beating until stiff peaks are formed. Set aside. Using an electric mixer, beat the egg yolks and the remaining sugar together until lemon-colored and very thick. About 1/4 cup at a time, sift the flour on top of the egg yolk and sugar mixture and fold it in. Mix a tablespoonful of beaten egg whites into the batter to lighten it, then gently fold in the rest of the whites. Keep a light touch throughout, handling the batter just enough to make sure it is evenly blended. Take a prepared pan and spread one-sixth of the batter on the bottom as evenly as possible. (One technique is to place the pan flat on the counter and twirl it counterclockwise with your left hand while spreading the batter clockwise with a knife or short spatula held in your right hand.) Let the batter touch the sides of the pan at several points. Place it in the middle of the preheated oven. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until the cake hardens and begins to turn color. Remove from the pan with a spatula, invert, and quickly but carefully tear off all the paper. Cool on a cake rack. Continue in this fashion until all the layers are baked. During the baking time, prepare the filling as follows.

CHOCOLATE CREAM FILLING
6 ounces semisweet chocolate (6 squares or 1 small package chocolate bits)
3 tablespoons strong coffee
1 cup (1/2 pound) butter
1 cup sifted vanilla confectioners' sugar
3 eggs

Melt the chocolate with the coffee in a double boiler or over very low heat. Cream the butter with the sugar and beat until fluffy. Add the melted chocolate and beat until it is well blended. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and continue beating until the cream is light and Huffy. Keep the filling in the refrigerator until ready to use.

CARAMEL GLAZE
3/4 cup granulated sugar

When all the layers are ready, pick the best one. for the top. Place it on a piece of waxed paper and set it aside. Spread filling on the first four layers and stack them; put the fifth layer on top. Saving enough filling for the fifth layer plus a little extra, frost the outside of the cake and then the fifth layer. Meanwhile, melt the sugar in a light-colored heavy skillet over low heat. Continue cooking until the caramel is smooth and quite brown. Do not touch or taste the caramel: it is very hot. When it is ready, pour it quickly over the; sixth layer, spreading it evenly with a spatula. With a buttered knife, quickly cut the caramel-topped layer into 12. or 16 wedges before the caramel hardens. As soon as it dries, place the wedges on top of the cake and use the rest of the filling to frost the outside of the fifth and sixth layers. If there is enough filling left, put it in a pastry bag and pipe a design along the top edge of the torta. Leave the cake in a cool place until ready to serve. Keep any leftovers in the refrigerator.
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Labs, have you ever made this cake?
  I wonder if there are other European versions of it.  It just sounds so familiar.
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Have never made it. Sounds wonderful, though. The only Hungarian dessert I've made is Kremes ("kre-mesh"), which is their version of a Napoleon.
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  I am not very familiar with Hungarian food, however, everything that I have had is fabulous.   This is really getting off of the desert topic, but years ago we had a pot luck dinner where someone brought a dish of noodles and cabbage, more like tiny dumplings really.  It was soooo good!!
  The recipe was given to me, and somehow I lost it (which is not like me at all).  Labs, Limey, do your best to retrieve it, pun intended Labs.
 
sarahfranks
I've heard some of the best food comes from middle Europe. I'm Greek, so that means I need to get my European fix from time to time, too!
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mmmm Hungarian food is awesome.....
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