Podcasts

Escoffier's Bechamel Sauce | Video



In a previous video I demonstrated how to make what I called a "semi-classic" bechamel sauce, which is the version most commonly taught in culinary schools today. However, sauce bechamel has gone through a few evolutions since it's debated creation.

One of the more common stories is that sauce bechamel was originally created by Louis de Bechamel's chef, who of course named his famous sauce after the guy signing the paychecks (celebrity chefs didn't exist in the 17th century). This "original" version of bechamel was actually a veloute or stock based sauce that was thickened with fresh cream.

Marie-Antoine Careme (1784-1883), considered to be the founder of haute cuisine, continued the tradition of making a stock based sauce, thickened with fresh cream and mounted it at the end of simmering with a liason (see links below).

Along came Escoffier (1886-1935), who's contribution to haute cuisine was to modernize and simplify Careme's complex recipes and ornate style. Escoffier also had the most influence on our understanding of the "Five French Mother Sauces," which he listed as hollandaise, veloute, tomat, espagnole and bechamel. It is at this point this point that bechamel became the milk based sauce thickened with a white roux that is commonly taught in culinary schools today.

Still influenced by Careme's bechamel flavors, Escoffier's version calls for "frying" white veal and minced onion together in butter, without allowing it to brown. This mixture is then added to the roux thickened milk with the addition of thyme, simmered for one hour, strained and seasoned with nutmeg, white pepper and salt.

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This post is part of our ongoing Sauces & Soups Video Series. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.
 

How To Butcher A Whole Salmon | Video



This video will teach you one of many techniques for butchering a whole salmon, or any "symmetrical fish," as opposed to a flat fish like halibut or sole.

In this video I state that I like to brine the fish briefly in a "5% brine." The brining process will keep the salmon moist during cooking. To calculate a 5% brine, weigh out enough filtered water to cover the finished salmon fillets. Multiply the weight of the water by .05 which will give you the amount of salt needed to achieve a 5% brine. For example, if you need 1,000g of water to cover your salmon fillets, simply multiply 1,000g X .05 = 50g of salt. Disperse 50g of salt into your water, which will result in a 5% brine.

Brine salmon for 20-60 minutes, rinse under a gentle stream of cold, running water and allow to drain.

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This post is part of our ongoing Culinary Knife Skills Video Series, which teaches you a wide array of knife skills used in professional kitchens. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.
 

"Culinary School" Bechamel Sauce | How To Video



This video will teach you how to make the most common version of béchamel taught in culinary schools today.

Further Information


This post is part of our ongoing Sauces & Soups Video Series. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.
 

SCS 19| Twelve Steps of Bread Baking

SCS Episode 19 The Twelve Steps Of Bread

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In this episode of The Stella Culinary School Podcast we discuss the twelve steps of the bread baking process.

Links and Information:

Recommended Books For Further Study

Also, check out this beautiful speech that Peter Reinhart gave at TedX concerning the 12 steps of bread.

 


 

For our complete list of audio lectures you can view The Stella Culinary School Podcast Index. For a list of video techniques, please visit our How To Cook Video Index. You can also subscribe to the Stella Culinary School Podcast feed through traditional RSS or iTunes.


 

 

How to Make a Basic Baguette | Video Recipe


This video will teach you how to make a great baguette in almost any oven.


Standardized Recipe
 


Tools Used In This Video

Further Information You Might Find Helpful

This post is part of our ongoing Bread Baking Video Series, which teaches a wide array of baking techniques and recipes. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.
 

How To Roast Beets | Video

Beets are one of my favorite food products to work with during fall and winter. They are extremely versatile, come in all different shapes and sizes, and have an earthiness that just screams “winter comfort food.” Although there are many different ways to prepare and serve beets, one of my favorites, and most classical methods, is roasting.

To Roast Beets:

  • Start by wrapping each beet individually in foil and then group by size.

  • Roast in a 500 F/260 C oven until you can easily poke a wooden skewer into the center. (For approximate roasting times, see below).

  • Once beets are done roasting, let cool in foil until cold enough to easily handle.

  • Unwrap the foil and peel off the beet skin by rubbing with a clean kitchen towel until the skin is completely removed.

  • Note: If peeling different colored beets at the same time, start by peeling the lightest colored beet and working your way up to the darkest, (the red beet). This will prevent the darker beets from staining the lighter beets.

  • Note #2: When handling red beets, it’s advisable that you wear plastic gloves so you won’t stain your hands, and be conscious that the beet will stain just about anything it comes into contact with.

Approximate Roasting Times For Beets @ 500 F/260 C Oven

  • Baby Beets (Golf Ball Size):  0:45 min-1:30 hours

  • Medium Beets (Baseball Size): 1:30-2 hours

  • Large Beets (Softball Size): 2-2:30 hours

  • Note: These times are just approximations and everyone’s oven is different. For true accuracy, use these times as a guideline and check for desired tenderness with a wooden skewer.

OK, Now What?

Now that you’ve successfully roasted and peeled your beets, here are some ideas of what you can do with them.

  • Dice up and use as a salad garnish.

  • Beets go great with cheese, especially Goat Cheese, Gorgonzola, Ricotta and Queso Fresco.

  • Beets also go great with Dijon Mustard, Sea Salt, Walnuts, and Tarragon.

  • Try combining some of the flavors and ingredients from above, and adding your own spin on presentation and flavor structure.

 

For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

 

 

How To De-Seed A Pomegranate | Video



This video will teach you how to quickly de-seed a pomegranate.

For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.
 

Kitchen Terminology Part 1| Hotel Pans and Service Pans (Video)



For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.
 

How To French Frog Legs


Frenching frog legs is a right of passage in many French kitchens. This video will teach you how to prep and french frog legs, allowing for a cleaner presentation and easier consumption.


For more posts like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.
 

What is the Baker's Percentage? | Video



This video will explain and demonstrate the baker's percentage.
What is the baker's percentage?
Below is a chart that illustrates traditional ratios for common types of bread dough.
What is the baker's percentage? Hydration & Ingredient Chart

Further Information

This post is part of our ongoing Bread Baking Video Series, which teaches a wide array of baking techniques and recipes. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

 

 
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