Ingredients

How To Pan Roast Fish | Video



Pan roasting at the simplest level is starting a food product in a hot pan on the stove-top and then finishing in the oven. In this video, we pan roast a piece of halibut to give it a great crust and a succulent texture. The number one key to this technique is to never peak at your crust side and trust your judgment.

Although halibut is used in this video, any thick fillet of fish can be pan roasted in the exact same fashion including salmon, sea bass and larger pieces of cod.

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For more posts just like this, check out our ongoing Cooking Techniques Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

How To Butcher And Portion Sides Of Halibut | Video Technique




This video is the start of Halibut week here on Stella Culinary. First, the video above will teach you how to take a large side of halibut and break it down into individual portions. Then on Wednesday, I'll be releasing a video on how to properly pan roast a piece of fish just like we do at Stella. The fish that I demonstrate this technique with will be a halibut fillet.

Finally on Friday, the much anticipated launch of our recipe video series "The Completed Dish," is kicked off with our top selling entrée, and the number one recipe requested by our guests; "pan roasted halibut, marinated tomato-panzanella salad and lemon caper beurre blanc."

Alaskan Halibut season usually starts sometime in early spring and will end mid fall. Right now is prime halibut season which has led us to use it not only as a signature entrée but also as one our favorite new apps; "halibut ceviche chalupa with fresh lime and cilantro." Photos to follow.

For more information on halibut, check out this great little article by Fish Ex.

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This post is part of our ongoing Culinary Knife Skills Video Series, which teaches you a wide array of knife skills used in professional kitchens. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Blanch Garlic | Video Technique


Blanched garlic is a great way to remove the harsh, bitter bite of raw garlic while still keeping the floral, garlic aroma and flavor. In Thomas Keller's The French Laundry Cookbook, his technique calls for the use of milk instead of water. I've found that for most purposes, water can achieve fairly comparable results and it's more cost effective.

How To Blanch Garlic
 

  • Put desired amount of garlic in a pot and cover with cold water.
  • Bring water to a boil.
  • Once water boils, strain garlic and add it back to the pot.
  • Cover with cold water, and repeat previous steps for a total of three times.
  • Blanching your garlic in this manner will get rid of the bitter taste and allow you to use as much garlic as desired without having to actually roast it. This technique also works great for any white garlic sauce, such as a garlic béchamel.
OK, Now What?

Now that you've made blanched garlic, you can use it for any number of recipes where a strong garlic flavor is desirable minus its assertive bite. Here are some recipes to give you a little inspiration:

For more posts just like this, check out our ongoing Kitchen Prep Video Series. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

What Is Clarified Butter | Definition Plus Video On How To Make

How To Clarify Butter


Clarified butter, (aka drawn butter), is whole, unsalted butter that is melted down and allowed to separate so that the milk solids can be removed. This clarification process raises the smoke point and makes it great for cooking.

The easiest way to clarify butter is over a water bath or double boiler. This allows you to gently heat the butter to the boiling point (212°F/100°C at sea level). What happens next is the water bubbles up out of the butter and evaporates, and the whey proteins form a "foam" on top.

Eventually this foam will dehydrate and collapse, leaving you a thin skin of whey protein on top and dry casein particles on the bottom. To finish the process, simply skim off the “skin” and pour off the clarified butter, being careful not to pour off any of the casein that's settled to the bottom.

At Stella, our standard cooking fat is a 50/50 mix of clarified butter and canola oil. Canola has a high smoke point and neutral flavor. The addition of clarified butter gives our proteins, especially fish, a beautiful, golden-brown glaze that can't be easily reproduced by other cooking fats. Since clarified butter is pure fat, it is shelf stable at room temperature for a couple of weeks to a month as long as it's stored in an airtight container. If stored in the refrigerator, clarified butter will last for months.

What is Ghee

Ghee is a clarified butter made using almost the identical technique as above, but is cooked in a pot instead of a double boiler. Because the milk solids come into direct contact with heat, they start to brown, giving the finished Ghee a dark brown color and a nutty aroma.

Ghee is often used in Indian and Middle Eastern Cuisine, especially in the preparation of rice. It has an extremely high smoke point (480°F/248°C), which makes it perfect for high temperature frying, sautés and stir-frys. 

 

How To Dice An Onion

 

How To Dice An Onion

To dice an onion, start by cutting off the top. However, leave the root end intact. This will hold the onion together while you dice.

Place the onion cut side down, slice in half, cutting from the root end down.

Peel off the skin and place the onion half flat on your cutting board. Make horizontal cuts up the onion, spacing them the same width that you want your finished dice to be. Quick Tip: remember to let your knife do the work for you by pulling the knife as you slice.

Now make vertical cuts, spaced the same width as your horizontal cuts, stopping just before you reach the root. Continue the vertical cuts all the way across the onion.

Finish your dice by cross-cutting the onion the same width as your vertical cuts.

If yield is more important than the precision of your dice, you can also dice the root portion of your onion. Flip your onion end root side up, make downward vertical cuts, and then cross-cut around the root to yield a rough dice.

This post is part of our ongoing Culinary Knife Skills Video Series, which teaches you a wide array of knife skills used in professional kitchens. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Make Chicken Stock



This video will take you through the process of making a roasted chicken stock as discussed in SCS 3| Stocks Part 2.

Further Information

This post is part of our ongoing Sauces & Soups Video Series. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Make Veal Stock | Video



In SCS 2| Stocks Part 1, we went through the science and technique of making a veal stock. This video will take you through the step by step process of how we make our fire roasted veal stock at Stella. If you're like most people and don't have a wood-fire oven, worry not. This technique can easily be accomplished with any oven that can reach 500°F/260°C.

Further Information

This post is part of our ongoing Sauces & Soups Video Series. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Make Vegetable Stock



In this video, learn how to make a classic vegetable stock.

Further Information

This post is part of our ongoing Sauces & Soups Video Series. For more information, you can also view our How To Cook Video Index.

How To Make Duck Pâté | Video Technique



This video will show you how to take the innards of a duck and turn it into a delicious pâté, complete with serving recommendations. A great giblet pate such as this should be slice-able yet spreadable, with a rosy pink color and a complex, well rounded flavor.

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For more techniques, recipes and information, check out our ongoing Charcuterie Video Index. You can also view our complete How To Cook Video Index.

How To Make A Trotter Terrine Using Plastic Wrap Part One



This video will take you from start to finish through the terrine making process. The wrapping technique can be used for any sort of shredded/braised meat including duck legs, chicken thighs, oxtail, ect.

The braised meat can be seasoned how ever you like, and is cured out with 2% kosher salt with 0.2% sodium nitrite added (calculated based on salt's weight), with the weight of the meat always being 100% (just like the baker's percentage). If you want to serve this terrine hot, I would recommend adding 0.8% Activa RM (Transglutiminase), although this is optional.

Ingredients Used In Final Meat Mix

  • 3000g Trotter Meat, Braised and Shredded
  • 60g Kosher Salt (3,000 x .02 = 60g)
  • 0.12g Sodium Nitrite (60g salt x .02 = 0.12g Sodium Nitrite)
  • 5g White Pepper, Finely Ground
  • 24g Activa RM (Optional)
  • 20g Dijon Mustard
  • 1b Parsley, Chopped
  • 1/2b Tarragon, Leaves Only
  • 4 Onions, Julienned and Carmelized (800g after being cooked)
Quick Tip: Since most people don't have a scale that is accurate to 1/100th of a gram, I would recommend making a larger batch of curing salt. The extra cure mix can be saved, and used for stuff like duck prosciutto, confit, or pancetta (videos to come). Weight out 500g of Kosher Salt and add to it 1g of sodium nitrite. Mix thoroughly, label properly and keep away from children.

The sodium nitrite in this recipe is optional, although if you leave it out, I would recommend bringing the kosher salt content up to 3% by weight and only curing your terrine for no longer then a month. You will also loose that pink, rosy color that is commonly associated with cured foods.

Update: Trotter Terrine Part Two

We just released HCC 4| Totter Terrine Part Two, which will show you what the terrine will look like after being cured for 30 days.



For more techniques, recipes and information, check out our ongoing Charcuterie Video Course. You can also view our complete